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With high operation frequencies, the effects of interconnects must be accounted for in the design of digital circuits. Interconnects can be modeled with RLC circuits, which are typically very large. Special order-reduction algorithms, which produce a smaller frequency-domain model of the interconnect , have been developed in the literature. Linking between(More)
This paper presents a robust partitioning-based model-order reduction (MOR) method, PartMOR, suitable for reduction of very large RLC circuits or RLC-circuit parts of a non-RLC circuit. The MOR is carried out on a partitioned circuit, which enables the use of low-order moments and macromodels of few elements, while still preserving good accuracy for the(More)
This paper proposes a new second-order Model Order Reduction (MOR) method suitable for reducing very large sized RC circuits or RC circuit parts of a non-RC circuit. The MOR is carried out on a partitioned circuit, which enables the use of low-order moments and macromodels of few elements. It is shown that the use of the second-order MOR method in(More)
RF circuits make great demands on simulators, especially when a circuit contains excitations at many different frequencies and the circuit is strongly nonlinear. In recent years, many new methods have been presented to analyze these kinds of circuits. One example, MSSTD analysis, has been implemented in the APLAC circuit simulator. It solves the steady(More)
This paper describes a model-order reduction (MOR) method to reduce an interconnect circuit with possibly dense inductive and capacitive coupling. The method uses partitioning to divide the original circuit into small parts that can be then approximated accurately with low-order reduced-order models (ROMs). The use of low-order ROMs enables the use of(More)
This paper proposes an admittance formulation for improving the stability of the structure-preserving reduced-order interconnect macromodeling algorithm SPRIM and the RLC equivalent circuit synthesis method RLCSYN. A simulation example is presented to show the benefits of admittance formulation.