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  • David C. Ackland, Sasha Roshan-Zamir, Martin Richardson, Marcus G. Pandy
  • Medicine
  • Journal of orthopaedic research : official…
  • 2011 (First Published: 1 December 2011)
  • The purposes of this study were to determine the contributions of each shoulder muscle to glenohumeral joint force during abduction and flexion in both the anatomical and post-operative shoulder andContinue Reading
  • Nadine E. Andrew, Belinda J. Gabbe, +4 authors Peter A Cameron
  • Medicine
  • Clinical journal of sport medicine : official…
  • 2008 (First Published: 1 September 2008)
  • OBJECTIVE To describe and identify predictors of 12-month outcomes of serious orthopaedic injuries due to sport and active recreation. DESIGN Prospective cohort study with 12-month follow-up. Continue Reading
  • N. Andrew, Rory Wolfe, +4 authors Belinda J. Gabbe
  • Medicine
  • Injury prevention : journal of the International…
  • 2012 (First Published: 1 December 2012)
  • BACKGROUND Hospitalised sport and active recreation injuries can have serious long-term consequences. Despite this, few studies have examined the long-term outcomes of these injuries. The purpose ofContinue Reading
  • Saeed Miramini, Lihai Zhang, +4 authors Glenn A. Edwards
  • Materials Science, Medicine, Engineering
  • Computer methods in biomechanics and biomedical…
  • 2015 (First Published: 1 June 2015)
  • Flexible fixation or the so-called 'biological fixation' has been shown to encourage the formation of fracture callus, leading to better healing outcomes. However, the nature of the relationshipContinue Reading
  • Martin Richardson, Ed Purssell
  • Medicine
  • Archives of disease in childhood
  • 2015 (First Published: 1 September 2015)
  • The nurses on the children's ward used to have a very fixed approach to fever in young children. If the child had a temperature of 38°C, they would strip the child down and ask the junior doctor onContinue Reading