Martin Kronenburg

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The DISCOUNT system is a distributed equational theorem prover based on the teamwork method for knowledge-based distribution. It uses an extended version of unfailing Knuth–Bendix completion that is able to deal with arbitrarily quantified goals. DISCOUNT features many different control strategies that cooperate using the teamwork approach. Competition(More)
This paper presents a new way to use planning in automated theorem proving by means of distribution. To overcome the problem that often subtasks for a proof problem can not be detected a priori (which prevents the use of the known planning and distribution techniques) we use a team of experts that work independently with diierent heuristics on the problem.(More)
This document contains a range of needs and requirements concerning the construction of a light control system for a floor of a university building. A description of the building architecture and of some pre-installed (light-)hardware is included. This problem description was the common input for all participants of the requirements engineering case study(More)
A generic approach to the formal specification of system requirements is presented. It is based on a pool of requirement patterns, which are related to design patterns wellknown in object-oriented software development. The application of such patterns enhances the reusability and genericity as well as the intelligibility of the formal requirement(More)
Abroad coalition of public and private health care organizations advocate the development of computerized immunization information systems as a key national strategy for achieving and sustaining high immunization coverage levels. However, widespread adoption requires greater awareness of the purpose, functions, and value of an immunization information(More)
Forest is a requirements engineering approach designed to support the creation of precise and intelligible problem speci cations of reactive systems. It integrates a product model, a process model, and an editing tool. In this paper, we present the results of applying the Forest approach to the Light Control Case Study. This includes the presentation of(More)
A generic approach to the formal specification of system requirements is presented. It is based on a pool of requirement patterns, which are related to design patterns well-known in object-oriented software development. The application of such patterns enhances the reusability and genericity as well as the intelligibility of the formal requirement(More)
A non-trivial real-time requirement obeying a pattern that can be found in various instantiations in the application domain building automation, and which is therefore called generic, is investigated in detail. Starting point is a description of a real-time problem in natural language augmented by a diagram, in a style often found in requirements documents.(More)
Based on the reference model for requirements and specifications of Jackson, Zave, et al. a reference model for problem specifications of reactive systems is defined. Considering the requirements specification technique FOREST, it is shown that both reference models can be instantiated using a real–time temporal logic and that they are compatible with(More)