Martin Groß

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The taxonomy of the genus Typhlocypris Vejdovský, 1882 is reviewed. New morphological information on Typhlocypris eremita (Vejdovský, 1882), the type species of the genus, is provided, and a new reference material is presented. The generic diagnosis is emended with details derived from the developmental trajectory of the valves, from the juvenile stage A-3(More)
Western Amazonia's landscape and biota were shaped by an enormous wetland during the Miocene epoch. Among the most discussed topics of this ecosystem range the question on the transitory influx of marine waters. Inter alia the occurrence of typically brackish water associated ostracods is repeatedly consulted to infer elevated salinities or even marine(More)
We apply network flow techniques to find good exit selections for evacuees in an emergency evacuation. More precisely, we present two algorithms for computing exit distributions using both classical flows and flows over time which are well known from combinatorial optimization. The performance of these new proposals is compared to a simple shortest path(More)
In Miocene times a vast wetland existed in Western Amazonia. Whereas the general development of this amazing ecosystem is well established, many questions remain open on sedimentary environments, stratigraphical correlations as well as its palaeogeographical configuration. Several outcrops located in a barely studied region around Eirunepé (SW Amazonas(More)
High resolution pollen and dinoflagellate analyses were performed on a continuous 98-cm-long core from Tortonian deposits of Lake Pannon in the Styrian Basin in Austria. The sample distance of 1-cm corresponds to a resolution of roughly one decade, allowing insights into environmental and climatic changes over a millennium of Late Miocene time. Shifts in(More)
A huge wetland (the 'Pebas system') covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine(More)