Marta Marchetti

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We report the first complete genome sequence of a beta-proteobacterial nitrogen-fixing symbiont of legumes, Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424. The genome consists of two chromosomes of size 3.42 Mb and 2.50 Mb, and a large symbiotic plasmid of 0.56 Mb. The C. taiwanensis genome displays an unexpected high similarity with the genome of the saprophytic(More)
Rhizobia are phylogenetically disparate alpha- and beta-proteobacteria that have achieved the environmentally essential function of fixing atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with legumes. Ample evidence indicates that horizontal transfer of symbiotic plasmids/islands has played a crucial role in rhizobia evolution. However, adaptive mechanisms that allow the(More)
Nitrogen-fixing symbionts of legumes have appeared after the emergence of legumes on earth, approximately 70 to 130 million years ago. Since then, symbiotic proficiency has spread to distant genera of α- and β-proteobacteria, via horizontal transfer of essential symbiotic genes and subsequent recipient genome remodeling under plant selection pressure. To(More)
The beta-rhizobium Cupriavidus taiwanensis forms indeterminate nodules on Mimosa pudica. C. taiwanensis bacteroids resemble free-living bacteria in terms of genomic DNA content, cell size, membrane permeability, and viability, in contrast to bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the galegoid clade. Bacteroid differentiation is thus unrelated to nodule(More)
Experimental evolution is a powerful approach to study the process of adaptation to new environments, including the colonization of eukaryotic hosts. Facultative endosymbionts, including pathogens and mutualists, face changing and spatially structured environments during the symbiotic process, which impose diverse selection pressures. Here, we provide(More)
Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous(More)
Mutualism is of fundamental importance in ecosystems. Which factors help to keep the relationship mutually beneficial and evolutionarily successful is a central question. We addressed this issue for one of the most significant mutualistic interactions on Earth, which associates plants of the leguminosae family and hundreds of nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacterial(More)
Ecological transitions between different lifestyles, such as pathogenicity, mutualism and saprophytism, have been very frequent in the course of microbial evolution, and often driven by horizontal gene transfer. Yet, how genomes achieve the ecological transition initiated by the transfer of complex biological traits remains poorly known. Here, we used(More)
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