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How sister kinetochores attach to microtubules from opposite spindle poles during mitosis (bi-orientation) remains poorly understood. In yeast, the ortholog of the Aurora B-INCENP protein kinase complex (Ipl1-Sli15) may have a role in this crucial process, because it is necessary to prevent attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules from the same(More)
A multisubunit complex, called cohesin, containing Smc1p, Smc3p, Scc1p, and Scc3p, is required for sister chromatid cohesion in mitotic cells. We show here that Smc3p and a meiotic version of Scc1p called Rec8p are required for cohesion between sister chromatids, for formation of axial elements, for reciprocal recombination, and for preventing(More)
The orderly reduction in chromosome number that occurs during meiosis depends on two aspects of chromosome behavior specific to the first meiotic division. These are the retention of cohesion between sister centromeres and their attachment to microtubules that extend to the same pole (monopolar attachment). By deleting genes that are upregulated during(More)
Certain cell types give rise to progeny that adopt different patterns of gene expression in the absence of any differences in their environment. Cells of budding yeast give birth to mother and daughter cells that differ in that only mother cells express the HO endonuclease gene and thereby switch mating types. We describe the identification of five genes,(More)
Entry into anaphase and proteolysis of B-type cyclins depend on a complex containing the tetratricopeptide repeat proteins Cdc16p, Cdc23p, and Cdc27p. This particle, called the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) or cyclosome, functions as a cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin-protein ligase. Two additional subunits of the budding yeast APC were identified: The(More)
Segregation of homologous maternal and paternal centromeres to opposite poles during meiosis I depends on post-replicative crossing over between homologous non-sister chromatids, which creates chiasmata and therefore bivalent chromosomes. Destruction of sister chromatid cohesion along chromosome arms due to proteolytic cleavage of cohesin's Rec8 subunit by(More)
Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis due to the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is essential for separation of sister chromatids, requiring degradation of the anaphase inhibitor Pds1, and for exit from mitosis, requiring inactivation of cyclin B Cdk1 kinases. Exit from mitosis in yeast involves accumulation of the cyclin kinase inhibitor Sic1 as well(More)
BACKGROUND The halving of chromosome number that occurs during meiosis depends on three factors. First, homologs must pair and recombine. Second, sister centromeres must attach to microtubules that emanate from the same spindle pole, which ensures that homologous maternal and paternal pairs can be pulled in opposite directions (called homolog(More)
Entry into anaphase and exit from mitosis depend on a ubiquitin-protein ligase complex called the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) or cyclosome. At least 12 different subunits were detected in the purified particle from budding yeast, including the previously identified proteins Apc1p, Cdc16p, Cdc23p, Cdc26p, and Cdc27p. Five additional subunits purified in(More)
BACKGROUND Meiosis is the process by which gametes are generated with half the ploidy of somatic cells. This reduction is achieved by three major differences in chromosome behavior during meiosis as compared to mitosis: the production of chiasmata by recombination, the protection of centromere-proximal sister chromatid cohesion, and the monoorientation of(More)