Marta Félez-Sánchez

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Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical(More)
In Catalonia, a screening protocol for cervical cancer, including human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing using the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay, was implemented in 2006. In order to monitor interlaboratory reproducibility, a proficiency testing (PT) survey of the HPV samples was launched in 2008. The aim of this study was to explore the repeatability(More)
Anal condylomata are common in HIV-positive individuals and among men who have sex with men (MSM). Generally attributable to infection by low-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), condylomata are considered benign low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). However, anal condylomata have occasionally been linked to high-grade SIL and to oncogenic,(More)
Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical(More)
Viruses rely completely on the hosts' machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from(More)
26 Chronic infection by oncogenic Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to cancers. 27 Public health interventions, such as cancer screening and mass vaccination, radically 28 change the ecological conditions encountered by circulating viruses. It is currently 29 unclear how HPVs communities may respond to these environmental changes, 30 because little is(More)
Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in the etiology of anogenital and head and neck cancers. The HPV DNA prevalence greatly differs by anatomical site. Indeed, the high rates of viral DNA prevalence in anal and cervical carcinomas contrast with the lower fraction of cancer cases attributable to HPVs in other anatomical sites, chiefly the vulva, the(More)
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