Markus Missler

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Brain function requires precisely orchestrated connectivity between neurons. Establishment of these connections is believed to require signals secreted from outgrowing axons, followed by synapse formation between selected neurons. Deletion of a single protein, Munc18-1, in mice leads to a complete loss of neurotransmitter secretion from synaptic vesicles(More)
Synaptic vesicles are coated by synapsins, phosphoproteins that account for 9% of the vesicle protein. To analyse the functions of these proteins, we have studied knockout mice lacking either synapsin I, synapsin II, or both. Mice lacking synapsins are viable and fertile with no gross anatomical abnormalities, but experience seizures with a frequency(More)
Synaptogenesis, the generation and maturation of functional synapses between nerve cells, is an essential step in the development of neuronal networks in the brain. It is thought to be triggered by members of the neuroligin family of postsynaptic cell adhesion proteins, which may form transsynaptic contacts with presynaptic alpha- and beta-neurexins and(More)
Neurexins are neuronal cell surface proteins with hundreds of isoforms generated by alternative splicing. Here we describe neuroligin 1, a neuronal cell surface protein that is enriched in synaptic plasma membranes and acts as a splice site-specific ligand for beta-neurexins. Neuroligin 1 binds to beta-neurexins only if they lack an insert in the(More)
Synapses are specialized intercellular junctions in which cell adhesion molecules connect the presynaptic machinery for neurotransmitter release to the postsynaptic machinery for receptor signalling. Neurotransmitter release requires the presynaptic co-assembly of Ca2+ channels with the secretory apparatus, but little is known about how synaptic components(More)
SV2 proteins are abundant synaptic vesicle proteins expressed in two major (SV2A and SV2B) and one minor isoform (SV2C) that resemble transporter proteins. We now show that SV2B knockout mice are phenotypically normal while SV2A- and SV2A/SV2B double knockout mice exhibit severe seizures and die postnatally. In electrophysiological recordings from cultured(More)
A family of proteins called complexins was discovered that compete with alpha-SNAP, but not synaptotagmin, for SNAP receptor binding. Complexins I and II are highly homologous hydrophilic proteins that are tightly conserved, with 100% identity among mouse, rat, and human complexin II. They are enriched in neurons where they colocalize with syntaxin and(More)
CASK is an evolutionarily conserved multidomain protein composed of an N-terminal Ca2+/calmodulin-kinase domain, central PDZ and SH3 domains, and a C-terminal guanylate kinase domain. Many potential activities for CASK have been suggested, including functions in scaffolding the synapse, in organizing ion channels, and in regulating neuronal gene(More)
The development of neuronal networks in the brain requires the differentiation of functional synapses. Neurobeachin (Nbea) was identified as a putative regulator of membrane protein trafficking associated with tubulovesicular endomembranes and postsynaptic plasma membranes. Nbea is essential for evoked transmission at neuromuscular junctions, but its role(More)
alpha-Neurexins (Ialpha, IIalpha, and IIIalpha) are receptor-like proteins expressed in hundreds of isoforms on the neuronal cell surface. The extracellular domains of alpha-neurexins are composed of six LNS repeats, named after homologous sequences in the Laminin A G domain, Neurexins, and Sex hormone-binding globulin, with three interspersed epidermal(More)