Markus Grompe

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Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human autosomal recessive cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C and ionizing radiation. Although six FA genes (for subtypes A, C, D2, E, F, and G) have been cloned, their relationship to DNA repair remains unknown. In the current study, we show that a nuclear complex containing the(More)
X-chromosome inactivation results in the cis-limited dosage compensation of genes on one of the pair of X chromosomes in mammalian females. Although most X-linked genes are believed to be subject to inactivation, several are known to be expressed from both active and inactive X chromosomes. Here we describe an X-linked gene with a novel expression(More)
The characterization of hepatic progenitor cells is of great scientific and clinical interest. Here we report that intravenous injection of adult bone marrow cells in the FAH(-/-) mouse, an animal model of tyrosinemia type I, rescued the mouse and restored the biochemical function of its liver. Moreover, within bone marrow, only rigorously purified(More)
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC). Six FA genes have been cloned, but the gene or genes corresponding to FA subtypes B and D1 remain unidentified. Here we show that cell lines derived from FA-B and FA-D1 patients have biallelic mutations in BRCA2(More)
The Wnt target gene Lgr5 (leucine-rich-repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5) marks actively dividing stem cells in Wnt-driven, self-renewing tissues such as small intestine and colon, stomach and hair follicles. A three-dimensional culture system allows long-term clonal expansion of single Lgr5(+) stem cells into transplantable organoids (budding(More)
Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare genetic cancer-susceptibility syndrome that is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone-marrow failure and cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Seven FA-associated genes have recently been cloned, and their products were found to interact with well-known DNA-damage-response proteins, including BRCA1, ATM and(More)
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease with birth defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. To date, genes for five of the seven known complementation groups have been cloned. Complementation group D is heterogeneous, consisting of two distinct genes, FANCD1 and FANCD2. Here we report the positional cloning of FANCD2. The gene consists of(More)
The appearance of bipotential oval cells in chronic liver injury suggests the existence of hepatocyte progenitor/stem cells. To study the origin and properties of this cell population, oval cell proliferation was induced in adult mouse liver by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) and a method for their isolation was developed. Transplantation(More)
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human autosomal recessive cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C and defective cell-cycle progression. Six FA genes (corresponding to subtypes A, C, D2, E, F, and G) have been cloned, and the encoded FA proteins interact in a common pathway. DNA damage activates this pathway, leading to(More)
Insulin-secreting β cells and glucagon-secreting α cells maintain physiological blood glucose levels, and their malfunction drives diabetes development. Using ChIP sequencing and RNA sequencing analysis, we determined the epigenetic and transcriptional landscape of human pancreatic α, β, and exocrine cells. We found that, compared with exocrine and β cells,(More)