Mark R. Schmeler

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Some individuals with disabilities are denied powered mobility because they lack the visual, motor, and/or cognitive skills required to safely operate a power wheelchair. The Drive-Safe System (DSS) is an add-on, distributed, shared-control navigation assistance system for power wheelchairs intended to provide safe and independent mobility to such(More)
Nonambulatory, visually impaired individuals mostly rely on caregivers for their day-to-day mobility needs. The Drive-Safe System (DSS) is a modular, semiautonomous smart wheelchair system aimed at providing independent mobility to people with visual and mobility impairments. In this project, clinical evaluation of the DSS was performed in a controlled(More)
This study explored the interrater reliability between a generalist practitioner administering the Functioning Everyday with a Wheelchair-Capacity (FEW-C) in person (IP) and a remote expert practitioner observing via telerehabilitation (TR) from more than 100 miles away. Each of the 46 participants was simultaneously rated by both the IP and TR(More)
This document, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Board of Directors in March 2007, shares typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the use of wheelchair standers.
This document, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Board of Directors on April 23, 2008, describes typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the application of tilt, recline, and elevating legrests for wheelchairs.
Rehabilitation service providers in rural or underserved areas are often challenged in meeting the needs of their complex patients due to limited resources in their geographical area. Recruitment and retention of the rural clinical workforce are beset by the ongoing problems associated with limited continuing education opportunities, professional isolation,(More)
This document, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Board of Directors in September 2005, shares typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the use of seat-elevating devices for wheelchair
Spinal deformities are common in people who require the use of a wheelchair for mobility as a result of spinal cord injuries and other disabilities. Sitting positions vary between individuals with disabilities who use wheelchairs and individuals without disabilities. In individuals with spinal cord injury, spinal deformities can result in the development of(More)
IntroductIon Telerehabilitation (TR) is a rehabilitation environment , in which the use of telecommunications technology provides rehabilitation and long-term support to people with disabilities in geographically-remote regions. Current wheelchair selection and evaluation processes are based on in-person assessment often not available to patients in(More)