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Tinnitus is an auditory phantom percept with a tone, hissing, or buzzing sound in the absence of any objective physical sound source. About 6% to 25% of the affected people report interference with their lives as tinnitus causes a considerable amount of distress. However, the underlying neurophysiological mechanism for the development of tinnitus-related(More)
Tinnitus is considered an auditory phantom percept analogous to phantom pain. Thalamocortical dysrhythmia has been proposed as a possible pathophysiological mechanism for both tinnitus and pain. Thalamocortical dysrhythmia refers to a persistent pathological resting state theta-gamma coupling that is spatially localized at an area where normally alpha(More)
OBJECTIVE Tinnitus can be considered an auditory phantom percept, in which patients hear an internal sound in the absence of any external sound source, mimicking tonal memory. Tinnitus however can be perceived exclusively uni- or bilaterally. METHODS The neurophysiological differences were investigated between unilateral and bilateral tinnitus using(More)
Tinnitus is considered as an auditory phantom percept. Preliminary evidence indicates that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the temporo-parietal area might reduce tinnitus. tDCS studies of the prefrontal cortex have been successful in reducing depression, impulsiveness and pain. Recently, it was shown that the prefrontal cortex is important(More)
BACKGROUND Tinnitus is an auditory sensation characterized by the perception of sound or noise in the absence of any external sound source. Based on neurobiological research, it is generally accepted that most forms of tinnitus are attributable to maladaptive plasticity due to damage to auditory system. Changes have been observed in auditory structures such(More)
OBJECT Tinnitus is an auditory phantom percept related to tonic and burst hyperactivity of the auditory system. Two parallel pathways supply auditory information to the cerebral cortex: the tonotopically organized lemniscal system, and the nontonotopic extralemniscal system, which fire in tonic and burst mode, respectively. Electrical cortex stimulation is(More)
BACKGROUND Non-pulsatile tinnitus is considered a subjective auditory phantom phenomenon present in 10 to 15% of the population. Tinnitus as a phantom phenomenon is related to hyperactivity and reorganization of the auditory cortex. Magnetoencephalography studies demonstrate a correlation between gamma band activity in the contralateral auditory cortex and(More)
INTRODUCTION Spinal cord stimulation is commonly used for neuropathic pain modulation. The major side effect is the onset of paresthesia. The authors describe a new stimulation design that suppresses pain as well as, or even better than, the currently used stimulation, but without creating paresthesia. METHODS A spinal cord electrode (Lamitrode) for(More)
OBJECTIVE Microvascular compressions of the cochlear nerve can lead to tinnitus. The tinnitus initially is related to nonsynchronous signal transmission in the auditory nerve, neurophysiologically characterized by a peak II amplitude decrease. Chronic compression can lead to a focal demyelination, resulting in an increase in Iinterpeak latency I-III with(More)
Somatic tinnitus has been defined as tinnitus temporally associated to a somatic disorder involving the head and neck. Several studies have demonstrated the interactions between the somatosensory and auditory system at the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), inferior colliculus, and parietal association areas. The objective is to verify the effect of(More)