Mark P. Mattson

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The neuropathological correlates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include amyloid-beta (Abeta) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. To study the interaction between Abeta and tau and their effect on synaptic function, we derived a triple-transgenic model (3xTg-AD) harboring PS1(M146V), APP(Swe), and tau(P301L) transgenes. Rather than crossing independent lines,(More)
Slowly but surely, Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients lose their memory and their cognitive abilities, and even their personalities may change dramatically. These changes are due to the progressive dysfunction and death of nerve cells that are responsible for the storage and processing of information. Although drugs can temporarily improve memory, at present(More)
Peroxidation of membrane lipids results in release of the aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), which is known to conjugate to specific amino acids of proteins and may alter their function. Because accumulating data indicate that free radicals mediate injury and death of neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and because amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) can promote(More)
Excitotoxicity, a form of neuronal injury in which excessive activation of glutamate receptors results in cellular calcium overload, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), although direct evidence is lacking. Mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene on chromosome 14 are causally linked to many cases of early-onset inherited AD(More)
The innate immune system senses the invasion of pathogenic microorganisms and tissue injury through Toll-like receptors (TLR), a mechanism thought to be limited to immune cells. We now report that neurons express several TLRs, and that the levels of TLR2 and -4 are increased in neurons in response to IFN-gamma stimulation and energy deprivation. Neurons(More)
To determine the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis resulting from dietary restriction (DR), heterozygous BDNF knockout (BDNF +/-) mice and wild-type mice were maintained for 3 months on DR or ad libitum (AL) diets. Mice were then injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and killed either 1 day or 4(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) and degeneration of neurons in brain regions such as the hippocampus, resulting in progressive cognitive dysfunction. The pathogenesis of AD is tightly linked to Abeta deposition and oxidative stress, but it remains unclear as to how these factors(More)
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) are known to regulate synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and neuronal survival in the adult brain. These two signals co-regulate one another such that 5-HT stimulates the expression of BDNF, and BDNF enhances the growth and survival of 5-HT neurons. Impaired 5-HT and BDNF(More)
We present the AGEMAP (Atlas of Gene Expression in Mouse Aging Project) gene expression database, which is a resource that catalogs changes in gene expression as a function of age in mice. The AGEMAP database includes expression changes for 8,932 genes in 16 tissues as a function of age. We found great heterogeneity in the amount of transcriptional changes(More)
Many patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) suffer cognitive impairment ranging from mild to severe (HIV dementia), which may result from neuronal death in the basal ganglia, cerebral cortex and hippocampus. HIV-1 does not kill neurons by infecting them. Instead, viral proteins released from infected glial cells, macrophages(More)