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Two large-scale yeast two-hybrid screens were undertaken to identify protein-protein interactions between full-length open reading frames predicted from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome sequence. In one approach, we constructed a protein array of about 6,000 yeast transformants, with each transformant expressing one of the open reading frames as a fusion(More)
The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completely sequenced through a worldwide collaboration. The sequence of 12,068 kilobases defines 5885 potential protein-encoding genes, approximately 140 genes specifying ribosomal RNA, 40 genes for small nuclear RNA molecules, and 275 transfer RNA genes. In addition, the complete sequence provides(More)
Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces(More)
The functions of many open reading frames (ORFs) identified in genome-sequencing projects are unknown. New, whole-genome approaches are required to systematically determine their function. A total of 6925 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed, by a high-throughput strategy, each with a precise deletion of one of 2026 ORFs (more than one-third of(More)
The sifting and winnowing of DNA sequence that occur during evolution cause nonfunctional sequences to diverge, leaving phylogenetic footprints of functional sequence elements in comparisons of genome sequences. We searched for such footprints among the genome sequences of six Saccharomyces species and identified potentially functional sequences. Comparison(More)
High-quality, well-annotated genome sequences and standardized laboratory strains fuel experimental and evolutionary research. We present improved genome sequences of three species of Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts: S. bayanus var. uvarum (CBS 7001), S. kudriavzevii (IFO 1802(T) and ZP 591), and S. mikatae (IFO 1815(T)), and describe their comparison to(More)
An in vivo selection system for isolating targets of DNA binding proteins in yeast was developed and used to identify the DNA binding site for the NGFI-B protein, a member of the steroid-thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. The feasibility of the technique was verified by selecting DNA fragments that contained binding sites for GCN4, a well-characterized(More)
The complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VIII reveals that it contains 269 predicted or known genes (300 base pairs or larger). Fifty-nine of these genes (22 percent) were previously identified. Of the 210 novel genes, 65 are predicted to encode proteins that are similar to other proteins of known or predicted function.(More)
Rgt1 is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that binds to the promoters of several HXT genes encoding glucose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and regulates their expression in response to glucose. Rgt1 contains a Zn(2)Cys(6) binuclear cluster responsible for DNA binding. Most proteins that contain this sequence motif bind as dimers to(More)
Expression of the HXT genes encoding glucose transporters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by two interconnected glucose-signaling pathways: the Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 glucose induction pathway and the Snf1-Mig1 glucose repression pathway. The Snf3 and Rgt2 glucose sensors in the membrane generate a signal in the presence of glucose that(More)