Mark H Ginsberg

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Cell migration is a highly integrated multistep process that orchestrates embryonic morphogenesis; contributes to tissue repair and regeneration; and drives disease progression in cancer, mental retardation, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. The migrating cell is highly polarized with complex regulatory pathways that spatially and temporally integrate its(More)
Integrins receive signals from other receptors that lead to activation of ligand binding (inside-out signaling) and matrix assembly. Upon binding ligands, they also activate intracellular signaling pathways. These signals converse with pathways that are initiated by soluble ligands to regulate cell functions. In this way, cell adhesion is coordinated with(More)
Migration of cells in higher organisms is mediated by adhesion receptors, such as integrins, that link the cell to extracellular-matrix ligands, transmitting forces and signals necessary for locomotion. Whether cells will migrate or not on a given substratum, and also their speed, depends on several variables related to integrin-ligand interactions,(More)
Control of integrin affinity for ligands (integrin activation) is essential for normal cell adhesion, migration, and assembly of an extracellular matrix. Integrin activation is usually mediated through the integrin beta subunit cytoplasmic tail and can be regulated by many different biochemical signaling pathways. We report that specific binding of the(More)
Regulation of integrin affinity (activation) is essential for metazoan development and for many pathological processes. Binding of the talin phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain to integrin beta subunit cytoplasmic domains (tails) causes activation, whereas numerous other PTB-domain-containing proteins bind integrins without activating them. Here we define(More)
Cell-directed changes in the ligand-binding affinity ('activation') of integrins regulate cell adhesion and migration, extracellular matrix assembly and mechanotransduction, thereby contributing to embryonic development and diseases such as atherothrombosis and cancer. Integrin activation comprises triggering events, intermediate signalling events and,(More)
We analyzed the binding of fibronectin to integrin alpha 5 beta 1 in various cells; in some cells fibronectin bound with low affinity (e.g., K562 cells) whereas in others (e.g., CHO), it bound with high affinity (Kd approximately 100 nM) in an energy-dependent manner. We constructed chimeras of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of alpha IIb beta 3(More)
The beta subunit cytoplasmic domains of integrin adhesion receptors are necessary for the connection of these receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. The cytoplasmic protein, talin, binds to beta integrin cytoplasmic tails and actin filaments, hence forming an integrin-cytoskeletal linkage. We used recombinant structural mimics of beta(1)A, beta(1)D and(More)
The angiogenic sprout has been compared to the growing axon, and indeed, many proteins direct pathfinding by both structures. The Roundabout (Robo) proteins are guidance receptors with well-established functions in the nervous system; however, their role in the mammalian vasculature remains ill defined. Here we show that an endothelial-specific Robo, Robo4,(More)
Integrins are a large family of cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion and influence migration, signal transduction, and gene expression. The cytoplasmic domains of integrins play a pivotal role in these integrin-mediated cellular functions. Through interaction with the cytoskeleton, signaling molecules, and other cellular proteins, integrin(More)