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Below are selected readings. For more books, visit the following sections in Knight Library: food history (GT2800s), GMOs (GT248), food politics (TX300s). A reference book in 6 volumes documenting food from ancient time to the present, focusing on food and its physical, spiritual, social, and cultural dimensions. Flammang looks at mealtime rituals of food(More)
OBJECTIVES Because larger food portions could be contributing to the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity, this study was designed to weigh samples of marketplace foods, identify historical changes in the sizes of those foods, and compare current portions with federal standards. METHODS We obtained information about current portions from(More)
Because the sizes of food portions, especially of fast food, have increased in parallel with rising rates of overweight, health authorities have called on fast-food chains to decrease the sizes of menu items. From 2002 to 2006, we examined responses of fast-food chains to such calls by determining the current sizes of sodas, French fries, and hamburgers at(More)
Traditional ways of preventing and treating overweight and obesity have almost invariably focused on changing the behavior of individuals, an approach that has proven woefully inadequate, as indicated by the rising rates of both conditions. Considering the many aspects of American culture that promote obesity, from the proliferation of fast-food outlets to(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine if obesity and dietary quality in low-income children differed by participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly the Food Stamp Program. METHODS The study population included 5193 children aged 4 to 19 with household incomes ≤130% of the federal poverty level from the 1999-2008 NHANES. Diet was(More)
The greater energy content of larger food portions could be contributing to the increasing prevalence of overweight. Prevention guidelines recommend "sensible" portion sizes but do not define them. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines standard serving sizes for dietary guidance, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines standard servings(More)