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Medical nutrition therapy for people with diabetes should be individualized, with consideration given to the individual's usual food and eating habits, metabolic profile, treatment goals and desired outcomes. Monitoring of metabolic parameters, including glucose, HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, and renal function, when appropriate, as well as(More)
M edical nutrition therapy (MNT) is important in preventing diabetes, managing existing diabetes, and preventing, or at least slowing, the rate of development of diabetes complications. It is, therefore, important at all levels of diabetes prevention (see Table 1). MNT is also an integral component of diabetes self-management education (or training). This(More)
There is no standard meal plan or eating pattern that works universally for all people with diabetes. In order to be effective, nutrition therapy should be individualized for each patient/client based on his or her individual health goals; personal and cultural preferences; health literacy and numeracy; access to healthful choices; and readiness,(More)
Current nutrition therapy recommendations for the prevention and treatment of diabetes are based on a systematic review of evidence and answer important nutrition care questions. First, is diabetes nutrition therapy effective? Clinical trials as well as systematic and Cochrane reviews report a ~1%-2% lowering of hemoglobin A1c values as well as other(More)
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