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Changing conventions in German causal clause complexes: A diachronic corpus study of translated and non-translated business articles
This paper contributes to the field of diachronic corpus studies of linguistic change through language contact in translation by replicating Becher’s (2011) study which found a trend from hypotaxisExpand
From hypotaxis to parataxis : an investigation of English-German syntactic convergence in translation
TLDR
Most of the evidence suggests that the shift towards parataxis is not predominantly caused by language contact with English, and there seems to be a development towards syntactically simpler constructions in this genre, which is most evident in the strong tendency towards sentence-splitting and an increased use of sentence-initial conjunctions in translations and non-translations. Expand
Changing conventions in German causal clause complexes
This paper contributes to the field of diachronic corpus studies of linguistic change through language contact in translation by replicating Becher’s (2011) study which found a trend from hypotaxisExpand
Translation and editing: a study of editorial treatment of nominalisations in draft translations
TLDR
The findings show that editors exert extensive and systematic influence on the translated text, and shows that sentences as literal translations which in reality have undergone a considerable amount of shifts while passing through the stages of translation. Expand
The editor’s invisibility: Analysing editorial intervention in translation
Most corpus-based studies of translation use published texts as the basis for their corpus. This overlooks interventions by other agents involved in translation such as editors, who may haveExpand
‘Lösen Sie Schachtelsätze möglichst auf ’: The impact of editorial guidelines on sentence splitting in German business article translations
Sentence splitting is assumed to occur mainly in translations from languages that prefer a hierarchical discourse structure, such as German, to languages that prefer an incremental structure. ThisExpand
Editing nominalisations in English−German translation: when do editors intervene?
ABSTRACT The work of editors and their influence on translated texts is an under-researched phenomenon in translation studies. We usually attribute the language we encounter in translated texts toExpand
Translated Language or Edited Language? A Study of Passive Constructions in Translation Manuscripts and their Published Versions
Abstract Can translated language really be analysed based on published texts, given the many agents that may influence the translator's work before publication? This article seeks to address this q...
A cross-linguistic analysis of the ‘homework’ metaphor in German and English political discourse
A frequently encountered expression in political discourse across languages is the assertion that someone has not ‘done their homework’. As the expression is a combination of structural metaphor andExpand
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