Marina Keul

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Receptor tyrosine kinases represent one of the prime targets in cancer therapy, as the dysregulation of these elementary transducers of extracellular signals, like the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), contributes to the onset of cancer, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Strong efforts were directed to the development of irreversible(More)
Oncogenic fusion events have been identified in a broad range of tumors. Among them, RET rearrangements represent distinct and potentially druggable targets that are recurrently found in lung adenocarcinomas. We provide further evidence that current anti-RET drugs may not be potent enough to induce durable responses in such tumors. We report that potent(More)
In modern cancer therapy, the use of small organic molecules against receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has been shown to be a valuable strategy. The association of cancer cells with dysregulated signaling pathways linked to RTKs represents a key element in targeted cancer therapies. The tyrosine kinase mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT is an example(More)
The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR is regulated by complex conformational changes, and this conformational control is disturbed in certain types of cancer. Many ligands are known to bind EGFR in its active conformation, thereby preventing ATP from binding. Only a few ligands are known to stabilize EGFR in its inactive conformation, thus providing novel(More)
Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor represents one of the most promising strategies in the treatment of lung cancer. Acquired resistance compromises the clinical efficacy of EGFR inhibitors during long-term treatment. The recently discovered EGFR-C797S mutation causes resistance against third-generation EGFR inhibitors. Here we present a(More)
Targeting acquired drug resistance represents the major challenge in the treatment of EGFR-driven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we describe the structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel class of covalent EGFR inhibitors that exhibit excellent inhibition of EGFR-mutant drug-resistant cells. Protein X-ray(More)
The specific targeting of oncogenic mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a breakthrough in targeted cancer therapy and marks a drastic change in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The recurrent emergence of resistance to these targeted drugs requires the development of novel chemical entities that efficiently inhibit(More)
Reversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors prompt a beneficial clinical response in non-small cell lung cancer patients who harbor activating mutations in EGFR. However, resistance mutations, particularly the gatekeeper mutation T790M, limit this efficacy. Here, we describe a structure-guided development of a series of covalent and(More)
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