Marina E. Eremeeva

8Gregory A. Dasch
4Christopher D. Paddock
3William L. Nicholson
2Sandor E. Karpathy
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This paper introduces a new Visual Analysis tool named IMAS (Interactive Multigenomic Analysis System), which combines common analysis tools such as Glimmer, BLAST, and Clustal-W into a unified Visual Analytic framework. IMAS displays the primary DNA sequence being analyzed by the biologist in a highly interactive, zoomable visual display. The user may(More)
len MG, Azad AF. Identifi cation of a novel rickettsial infection in a patient diagnosed with murine typhus.cation of a novel spotted fever rickettsiae, strain IG-1, from Ixodes granulatus ticks collected on Orchid Island (Lanyu), Tai-wan. identifi cation of Coxiella burnetii plas-mids in human sera by nested PCR. To the Editor: Bartonella and Rickettsia(More)
The complete genome sequences available for eight species of Rickettsia and information for other near relatives in the Rickettsiales including Orientia and species of Anaplasmataceae are a rich resource for comparative analyses of the evolution of these obligate intracellular bacteria. Differences in these organisms have permitted them to colonize varied(More)
In Brazil, Brazilian spotted fever was once considered the only tick-borne rickettsial disease. We report eschar-associated rickettsial disease that occurred after a tick bite. The etiologic agent is most related to Rickettsia parkeri, R. africae, and R. sibirica and probably widely distributed from Sao Paulo to Bahia in the Atlantic Forest.
Clinical reports of an eschar-associated rickettsiosis in the Paraná River Delta of Argentina prompted an evaluation of Amblyomma triste ticks in this region. When evaluated by PCR, 17 (7.6%) of 223 questing adult A. triste ticks, collected from 2 sites in the lower Paraná River Delta, contained DNA of Rickettsia parkeri.
Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii. The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.
  • Dora Estripeaut, María Gabriela Aramburú, Xavier Sáez-Llorens, Herbert A. Thompson, Gregory A. Dasch, Christopher D. Paddock +2 others
  • 2007
We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South(More)
In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All(More)
Sucking lice (Phthiraptera: Anoplura) are obligate blood-feeding ectoparasites of placental mammals including humans. Worldwide, more than 550 species have been described and many are specific to a particular host species of mammal [1]. Three taxa uniquely parasitize humans: the head louse, body louse, and crab (pubic) louse. The body louse, in particular,(More)
In August 2008, Texas authorities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated reports of increased numbers of febrile rash illnesses in Austin to confirm the causative agent as Rickettsia typhi, to assess the outbreak magnitude and illness severity, and to identify potential animal reservoirs and peridomestic factors that may have(More)