Mariko Yokogawa

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G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) plays a crucial role in regulating heart rate and neuronal excitability. The gating of GIRK is regulated by the association and dissociation of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ), which are released from pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein α subunit (Gα(i/o)) upon GPCR activation in vivo. Several lines(More)
CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and plays important roles in the inflammatory response. In addition, its ligands inhibit the HIV infection. Structural analyses of CCR5 have been hampered by its instability in the detergent-solubilized form. Here, CCR5 was reconstituted into high density lipoprotein(More)
G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) plays crucial roles in regulating heart rate and neuronal excitability in eukaryotic cells. GIRK is activated by the direct binding of heterotrimeric G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) upon stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors, such as M2 acetylcholine receptor. The binding of Gβγ to the(More)
We have determined the binding site on agitoxin2 (AgTx2) to the KcsA K(+) channel by a transferred cross-saturation (TCS) experiment. The residues significantly affected in the TCS experiments formed a contiguous surface on AgTx2, and substitutions of the surface residues decreased the binding affinity to the KcsA K(+) channel. Based on properties of the(More)
Regnase-1 is an RNase that directly cleaves mRNAs of inflammatory genes such as IL-6 and IL-12p40, and negatively regulates cellular inflammatory responses. Here, we report the structures of four domains of Regnase-1 from Mus musculus-the N-terminal domain (NTD), PilT N-terminus like (PIN) domain, zinc finger (ZF) domain and C-terminal domain (CTD). The PIN(More)
Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ).(More)
Chemical exchange processes of proteins on the order of microseconds (μs) to milliseconds (ms) play critical roles in biological functions. Developments in methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (methyl-TROSY), which observes the slowly relaxing multiple quantum (MQ) coherences, have enabled the studies of biologically important large proteins.(More)
Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) act as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of GDP-bound form of the G protein α subunit (Gα(GDP)) and G protein βγ subunit(More)
Phosphoinositides (PIs) are crucial lipid components of membranes and are involved in a number of cellular processes through interactions with their effector proteins. Recently, we have established a lipid-protein nanoscale bilayer (nanodisc) containing PIs, hereafter referred to as PI-nanodisc and demonstrated that it could be used for both qualitative and(More)
G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) plays crucial roles in regulating heart rate and neuronal excitability in eukaryotic cells. A variety of ligands, including heterotrimeric G protein betagamma subunits (G betagamma), bind to the cytoplasmic regions of GIRK and modulate its activity. We established the backbone resonance(More)