Maria Radanova

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C1q is the recognition subunit of the first component of the classical complement pathway. It participates in clearance of immune complexes and apoptotic cells as well as in defense against pathogens. Inappropriate activation of the complement contributes to cellular and tissue damage in different pathologies, urging the need for the development of(More)
Lupus nephritis is one of the most severe manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Higher titers of serum anti-C1q autoantibodies correlate with disease activity in patients with lupus nephritis. Anti-C1q autoantibodies have been shown to bind neo-epitopes within the collagen region of human C1q. In a preliminary study, we recently reported that the(More)
C1q plays a key role in apoptotic cell and immune complex removal. Its absence contributes to the loss of tolerance toward self structures and development of autoimmunity. C1q deficiencies are extremely rare and are associated with complete lack of C1q or with secretion of surrogate C1q fragments. To our knowledge, we report the first case of a functional(More)
High levels of autoantibodies to some complement proteins are detected in the sera of SLE patients. Anti-C1q autoantibodies make a great part of them. Their presence is associated with renal involvement, in particular with lupus nephritis (LN) and the titre of these autoantibodies correlates with the clinical activity of the disease. We analysed by ELISA 18(More)
INTRODUCTION Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that can affect substantially any organ in the body. One of its most severe manifestations is lupus nephritis. Hereditary C1q deficiency is strongly related to SLE but there are very few and inconsistent studies exploring the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the C1q(More)
The anti-C1q antibodies present in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients' sera are associated with renal involvement and the titer of these autoantibodies correlates with the clinical activity of the disease. It has previously been shown that anti-C1q antibodies bind neo-epitopes within the collagen region of human C1q. Evidence that these polyclonal(More)
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