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Brassicaceae Burnett (syn. Cruciferae A.L. de Jussieu) include many important economic plants used as edible or ornamental which are commonly known as the “mustard” plant family due to the sharp, potent flavour of their sulfur metabolites, the glucosinolates. Brassicas also produce phenolics, tocopherols and peculiar seed oils. Current scientific knowledge(More)
Brassicaceae Burnett (syn. Cruciferae A. L. de Jussieu) include many important economic plants used as edibile or ornamental. They are commonly known as the “mustard” plant family due to the sharp, potent flavour of their main metabolites, the glucosinolates (GLSs) which contain sulfur. Glucosinolates coexist in vivo with glycosylated thioglucosidases,(More)
Aerial parts of Achillea moschata Wulfen (Asteraceae) growing wild in the Italian Rhaetian Alps were investigated to describe, for the first time, their phenolic content, as well as to characterize the essential oil. Inspection of the metabolic profile combining HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS/MS data showed that the methanol extract contained glycosylated flavonoids(More)
Essential oils (EOs) from Moroccan ecotypes of Artemisia herba-alba, Citrus sinensis, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus satureioides and their main components were comparatively evaluated for their in vitro activity against the phytonematode species Meloidogyne incognita, Pratylenchus vulnus and Xiphinema index. Suppressiveness of drench or fumigation soil(More)
Nematotoxic effect of an aqueous extract of Artemisia annua and its components caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-CQA), artemisinin and the related semi-synthetic artesunate, was investigated on the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis and on the virus-vector dagger nematode(More)
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