Maria Pechlaner

Learn More
Folding of group II introns is characterized by a first slow compaction of domain 1 (D1) followed by the rapid docking of other domains to this scaffold. D1 compaction initiates in a small subregion encompassing the κ and ζ elements. These two tertiary elements are also the major interaction sites with domain 5 to form the catalytic core. Here, we provide(More)
One of the first events taking place when a crystal of a metalloprotein is exposed to X-ray radiation is photoreduction of the metal centres. The oxidation state of a metal cannot always be determined from routine X-ray diffraction experiments alone, but it may have a crucial impact on the metal's environment and on the analysis of the structural data when(More)
Metal ions are inextricably involved with nucleic acids due to their polyanionic nature. In order to understand the structure and function of RNAs and DNAs, one needs to have detailed pictures on the structural, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of metal ion interactions with these biomacromolecules. In this review we first compile the physicochemical(More)
NMR spectroscopy has revealed pH-dependent structural changes in the highly conserved catalytic domain 5 of a bacterial group II intron. Two adenines with pK(a) values close to neutral pH were identified in the catalytic triad and the bulge. Protonation of the adenine opposite to the catalytic triad is stabilized within a G(syn)-AH(+) (anti) base pair. The(More)
Self-splicing group II introns are highly structured RNA molecules, containing a characteristic secondary and catalytically active tertiary structure, which is formed only in the presence of Mg(II). Mg(II) initiates the first folding step governed by the κζ element within domain 1 (D1κζ). We recently solved the NMR structure of D1κζ derived from the(More)
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data obtained for a 35-nucleotide RNA segment of a bacterial group II intron indicate a helical hairpin structure in which three parts, a terminal pentaloop, a bulge, and a G-A mismatch, display no Watson-Crick base pairing. The 668 NOE upper distance bounds for atom pairs are(More)
RNA molecules fold into complex structures that allow them to perform specific functions. To compensate the relative lack of diversity of functional groups within nucleotides, metal ions work as crucial co-factors. In addition, shifted pKas are observed in RNA, enabling acid-base reactions at ambient pH. The central catalytic domain 5 (D5) hairpin of the(More)
Folding of group II introns is characterized by a first slow compaction of domain 1 (D1) followed by the rapid docking of other domains to this scaffold. D1 compaction initiates in a small subregion encompassing the i and f elements. These two tertiary elements are also the major interaction sites with domain 5 to form the catalytic core. Here, we provide(More)
  • 1