Maria Papanatsiou

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Stomata account for much of the 70% of global water usage associated with agriculture and have a profound impact on the water and carbon cycles of the world. Stomata have long been modeled mathematically, but until now, no systems analysis of a plant cell has yielded detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational analysis. Here, we demonstrate the(More)
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third biological gasotransmitter, and in animals, it affects many physiological processes by modulating ion channels. H2S has been reported to protect plants from oxidative stress in diverse physiological responses. H2S closes stomata, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the selective inactivation of(More)
Phototropins (phots) regulate a range of adaptive processes in plants that serve to optimize photosynthetic efficiency and promote growth. Light sensing by Arabidopsis thaliana phots is predominantly mediated by the Light, Oxygen and Voltage sensing 2 (LOV2) flavin-binding motif located within the N-terminus of the photoreceptor. Here we characterize the(More)
GORK is the only outward-rectifying Kv-like K(+) channel expressed in guard cells. Its activity is tightly regulated to facilitate K(+) efflux for stomatal closure and is elevated in ABA in parallel with suppression of the activity of the inward-rectifying K(+) channel KAT1. Whereas the population of KAT1 is subject to regulated traffic to and from the(More)
Stomata enable gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere through the stomatal pore. Control of the pore aperture depends on osmotic solute accumulation by, and its loss from the guard cells surrounding the pore. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal cell, and this spacing is thought to enhance stomatal(More)
Stomatal movements depend on the transport and metabolism of osmotic solutes that drive reversible changes in guard cell volume and turgor. These processes are defined by a deep knowledge of the identities of the key transporters and of their biophysical and regulatory properties, and have been modelled successfully with quantitative kinetic detail at the(More)
Stomata enable gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere through the stomatal pore. Control of the pore aperture depends on osmotic solute accumulation by, and its loss from the guard cells surrounding the pore. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal cell, and this spacing is thought to enhance stomatal(More)
Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Cell Press, an imprint of Elsevier Inc., on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS. Stomata in most land plants are formed by a pair of guard cells, controlling the water loss and the carbon dioxide uptake. The development, patterning, and density of stomata are fundamental traits(More)
Stomata are microscopic pores formed by specialized cells in the leaf epidermis and permit gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal pavement cell and, individually, overlay a single substomatal cavity within the leaf. This spacing is thought to enhance stomatal(More)
Much of the 70% of global water usage associated with agriculture passes through stomatal pores of plant leaves. The guard cells, which regulate these pores, thus have a profound influence on photosynthetic carbon assimilation and water use efficiency of plants. We recently demonstrated how quantitative mathematical modeling of guard cells with the OnGuard(More)
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