Maria Chahrour

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Mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome. Loss of function as well as increased dosage of the MECP2 gene cause a host of neuropsychiatric disorders. To explore the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders, we examined gene expression(More)
Mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2), cause Rett syndrome and several neurodevelopmental disorders including cognitive disorders, autism, juvenile-onset schizophrenia and encephalopathy with early lethality. Rett syndrome is characterized by apparently normal early development(More)
Vertebrate skeletogenesis involves two processes, skeletal patterning and osteoblast differentiation. Here, we show that Satb2, encoding a nuclear matrix protein, is expressed in branchial arches and in cells of the osteoblast lineage. Satb2-/- mice exhibit both craniofacial abnormalities that resemble those observed in humans carrying a translocation in(More)
A group of post-natal neurodevelopmental disorders collectively referred to as MeCP2 disorders are caused by aberrations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Loss of MeCP2 function causes Rett syndrome (RTT), whereas increased copy number of the gene causes MECP2 duplication or triplication syndromes. MeCP2 acts as a transcriptional(More)
G enetic conditions affecting hair structure or the hair growth cycle may be isolated or they may occur as part of complex syndromes with associated abnormalities of other ectodermal appendages. Defective hair structure caused by mutations in key hair structural proteins can result in severe alopecia. The best characterised conditions at the molecular level(More)
Although autism has a clear genetic component, the high genetic heterogeneity of the disorder has been a challenge for the identification of causative genes. We used homozygosity analysis to identify probands from nonconsanguineous families that showed evidence of distant shared ancestry, suggesting potentially recessive mutations. Whole-exome sequencing of(More)
Though many hearing impairment genes have been identified, only a few of these genes have been screened in population studies. For this study, 168 Pakistani families with autosomal recessive hearing impairment not due to mutations in the GJB2 (Cx26) gene underwent a genome scan. Two-point and multipoint parametric linkage analyses were carried out. Twelve(More)
Despite significant heritability of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), their extreme genetic heterogeneity has proven challenging for gene discovery. Studies of primarily simplex families have implicated de novo copy number changes and point mutations, but are not optimally designed to identify inherited risk alleles. We apply whole-exome sequencing (WES) to(More)
Advances in genetic tools and sequencing technology in the past few years have vastly expanded our understanding of the genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent high-throughput sequencing analyses of structural brain malformations, cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders, and localized cortical dysplasias have uncovered a diverse genetic landscape(More)