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Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with cognitive deficits and morphometric brain abnormalities in childhood and a markedly elevated risk of schizophrenia in adolescence/early adulthood. Determining the relationship between neurocognition and neuroimaging findings would yield crucial information about childhood neurodevelopment and(More)
Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion syndrome associated with a markedly elevated risk of schizophrenia in adulthood. Cognitive impairments such as a low IQ and deficits in attention and executive function are common in childhood. The catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene maps within the deleted region and is involved(More)
Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with elevated rates of schizophrenia and other psychoses in adulthood. Childhood morphologic brain abnormalities are frequently reported, but the significance of these and their relationship to the development of schizophrenia are unclear. We sought to delineate midline neuroanatomical abnormalities(More)
The COMT gene is thought to contribute to the cognitive/psychiatric phenotypes in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We measured these manifestations against the Val/Met alleles of the COMT gene, in 40 nonpsychotic 22q11DS children. The Val allele was associated with poor IQ, processing speed, executive function and a higher frequency of anxiety disorders,(More)
Intact cell preparations, isolated from the livers of fasted rats and treated with rotenone or antimycin A, retain a limited ability to oxidize long chain fatty acids but not short chain species or other usual substrates. Cells prepared from livers of animals treated with clofibrate to induce peroxisomal proliferation have even greater long chain fatty acid(More)
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