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Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1(More)
Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a chloride channel. Nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1), one of two ABC domains in CFTR, also contains sites for the predominant CF-causing mutation and, potentially, for regulatory phosphorylation. We have determined crystal structures(More)
The DeltaF508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and DeltaF508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and(More)
BACKGROUND Monitoring CYP2E1 levels in alcoholic individuals holds inherent appeal because such determinations might indicate individuals at increased risk for alcoholic liver disease. We previously demonstrated that lymphocyte CYP2E1 expression reflects in vivo activity of the hepatic enzyme. METHODS To further validate this approach, the current(More)
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