Marga Vicedo

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  • Marga Vicedo
  • Journal of the history of the behavioral sciences
  • 2009
MARGA VICEDO teaches history of biology at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto. She holds a PhD in philosophy of science from the University of Valencia, and a PhD in history of science from Harvard University. She is interested in the history and philosophy of biology in the twentieth century,(More)
This paper examines the development of British psychiatrist and psychoanalyst John Bowlby's views and their scientific and social reception in the United States during the 1950s. In a 1951 report for the World Health Organization Bowlby contended that the mother is the child's psychic organizer, as observational studies of children worldwide showed that(More)
  • Marga Vicedo
  • Isis; an international review devoted to the…
  • 2012
Starting in 1958, Harry Harlow published numerous research papers analyzing the emotional and social development of rhesus monkeys. This essay examines the presentation of Harlow's work in introductory psychology textbooks from 1958 to 1975, focusing on whether the textbooks erased the process of research, presented results without hedging, and provided a(More)
  • Marga Vicedo
  • Isis; an international review devoted to the…
  • 2012
Textbooks have a low status in the history of science because they have been seen as mere repositories for scientific knowledge. But historians have recently shown how they play a number of roles that can illuminate different aspects of the history of science, from priority disputes to pedagogical practices. The essays in this Focus section aim to expand(More)
  • Marga Vicedo
  • Isis; an international review devoted to the…
  • 2009
Konrad Lorenz's popularity in the United States has to be understood in the context of social concern about the mother-infant dyad after World War II. Child analysts David Levy, René Spitz, Margarethe Ribble, Therese Benedek, and John Bowlby argued that many psychopathologies were caused by a disruption in the mother-infant bond. Lorenz extended his work on(More)
This paper explores ethologist Niko Tinbergen's path from animal to human studies in the 1960s and 1970s and his views about human nature. It argues, first, that the confluence of several factors explains why Tinbergen decided to cross the animal/human divide in the mid 1960s: his concern about what he called "the human predicament," his relations with(More)