Marga G. van de Vegte-Bolmer

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Difficulties with inducing sterile and long lasting protective immunity against malaria with subunit vaccines has renewed interest in vaccinations with attenuated Plasmodium parasites. Immunizations with sporozoites that are attenuated by radiation (RAS) can induce strong protective immunity both in humans and rodent models of malaria. Recently, in rodent(More)
There is much evidence that some pathogens manipulate the behaviour of their mosquito hosts to enhance pathogen transmission. However, it is unknown whether this phenomenon exists in the interaction of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto with the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum--one of the most important interactions in the context of humanity, with(More)
BACKGROUND Immunization of healthy volunteers by bites from Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes during chloroquine chemoprophylaxis (hereafter, chemoprophylaxis and sporozoites [CPS] immunization) induces sterile protection against malaria. CPS-induced protection is mediated by immunity against pre-erythrocytic stages, presumably at least partially by(More)
BACKGROUND The spread of drug resistance has been a major obstacle to the control of malaria. The mechanisms underlying drug resistance in malaria seem to be complex and multigenic. The current literature on multiple drug resistance against anti-malarials has documented PfMDR1, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein, as an important determinant of(More)
BACKGROUND We have shown that immunity to infection with Plasmodium falciparum can be induced experimentally in malaria-naive volunteers through immunisation by bites of infected mosquitoes while simultaneously preventing disease with chloroquine prophylaxis. This immunity was associated with parasite-specific production of interferon γ and interleukin 2 by(More)
Malaria transmission blocking vaccines (TBVs) are considered an effective means to control and eventually eliminate malaria. The Pfs25 protein, expressed predominantly on the surface of the sexual and sporogonic stages of Plasmodium falciparum including gametes, zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the primary targets for TBV. It has been demonstrated that(More)
BACKGROUND Naturally acquired immune responses against sexual stages of P. falciparum can reduce the transmission of malaria from humans to mosquitoes. These antigens are candidate transmission-blocking vaccines but little is known about the acquisition of sexual stage immunity after exposure to gametocytes, or their longevity and functionality. We(More)
Renewed global efforts toward malaria eradication have highlighted the need for novel antimalarial agents with activity against multiple stages of the parasite life cycle. We have previously reported the discovery of a novel class of antimalarial compounds in the imidazolopiperazine series that have activity in the prevention and treatment of blood stage(More)
UNLABELLED We established a new field clone of Plasmodium falciparum for use in controlled human malaria infections and vaccine studies to complement the current small portfolio of P. falciparum strains, primarily based on NF54. The Cambodian clone NF135.C10 consistently produced gametocytes and generated substantial numbers of sporozoites in Anopheles(More)
Mosquito feeding assays are important in evaluations of malaria transmission-reducing interventions. The proportion of mosquitoes with midgut oocysts is commonly used as an outcome measure, but in natural low intensity infections the effect of oocyst non-rupture on mosquito infectivity is unclear. By identifying ruptured as well as intact oocysts, we show(More)