Marco D. Mukrasch

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Alzheimer disease is characterized by abnormal protein deposits in the brain, such as extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. The tangles are made of a protein called tau comprising 441 residues in its longest isoform. Tau belongs to the class of natively unfolded proteins, binds to and stabilizes microtubules, and partially(More)
Aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau into neurofibrillary tangles is the pathological hallmark of a variety of dementias. For reasons not yet known, tau becomes excessively phosphorylated in Alzheimer's brains and as a result no longer binds properly to microtubules. Here we studied the impact of phosphorylation on the conformational and(More)
Tau, a natively unstructured protein that regulates the organization of neuronal microtubules, is also found in high concentrations in neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The conformational transition between these vastly different healthy and pathological forms remains poorly understood. We have measured(More)
The aggregation of the microtubule-associated tau protein and formation of "neurofibrillary tangles" is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. The mechanisms underlying the structural transition of innocuous, natively unfolded tau to neurotoxic forms and the detailed mechanisms of binding to microtubules are largely unknown. Here we report the(More)
Several mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein tau are responsible for the formation of neurofibrillary inclusions in frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Here we present the high-resolution characterization of the conformational properties of two FTDP-17 mutants of the four-repeat domain of(More)
The aggregation of the microtubule-associated tau protein and formation of “neurofibrillary tangles” is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. The mechanisms underlying the structural transition of innocuous, natively unfolded tau to neurotoxic forms and the detailed mechanisms of binding to microtubules are largely unknown. Here we report the(More)
Filaments of the protein tau are a characteristic occurrence in Alzheimer disease and many other neurodegenerative disorders and the distribution of tau filaments correlates well with the loss of neurons and cognitive functions in Alzheimer disease. Filament formation of tau filaments is based on structural transitions from random coil to b-structure, to(More)
Transition metals have been frequently recognized as risk factors in neurodegenerative disorders, and brain lesions associated with Alzheimer's disease are rich in Fe(III), Zn(II), and Cu(II). By using different biophysical techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism, light scattering, and microcalorimetry), we have structurally characterized(More)
Misfolding of the microtubule-associated protein Tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders. Because of the dynamic nature of the Tau protein, little is known about the changes in Tau structure that occur during misfolding. Here we studied the structural consequences upon binding of the repeat domain of Tau, which(More)
The structural analysis of the redox complex between the soluble cytochrome c552 and the membrane-integral cytochrome ba3 oxidase of Thermus thermophilus is complicated by the transient nature of this protein-protein interaction. Using NMR-based chemical shift perturbation mapping, however, we identified the contact regions between cytochrome c552 and the(More)