Marco Catucci

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Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked Primary Immunodeficiency that affects 1-10 out of 1 million male individuals. WAS is caused by mutations in the WAS Protein (WASP) expressing gene that leads to the absent or reduced expression of the protein. WASP is a cytoplasmic protein that regulates the formation of actin filaments in hematopoietic(More)
The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein (WASp) is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton in hematopoietic cells. Mutations of the WASp gene cause WAS. Although WASp is involved in various immune cell functions, its role in invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells has never been investigated. Defects of iNKT cells could indeed contribute to several WAS(More)
Mutations in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein (WASp), a regulator of actin dynamics in hematopoietic cells, cause WAS, an X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and a marked predisposition to develop autoimmune disorders. The mechanisms that link actin alterations to the autoimmune phenotype are still poorly(More)
Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) regulates the cytoskeleton in hematopoietic cells and mutations in its gene cause the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS), a primary immunodeficiency with microthrombocytopenia, eczema and a higher susceptibility to develop tumors. Autoimmune manifestations, frequently observed in WAS patients, are associated with an(More)
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by the defective expression of the WAS protein (WASP) in hematopoietic cells. It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are functionally impaired in WAS patients and was(-/-) mice. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy and safety of a murine model of WAS gene therapy(More)
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