Marcin Zawrotniak

Learn More
Neutrophils are cells of the immune system which freely circulate in blood vessels and are recruited to the inflammation sites when the human organism responds to microbial infections. One of the mechanisms of neutrophil action is the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) The process of NET generation, called netosis, is a specific type of cell(More)
Neutrophils form the first line of host defense against infections that combat pathogens using two major mechanisms, the phagocytosis or the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The netosis (NET formation) exerts additional, unfavorable effects on the fitness of host cells and is also involved at the sites of lung infection, increasing the(More)
BACKGROUND Vitamins are chemical compounds whose derivatives are involved in vital metabolic pathways of all living organisms. The complete endogenous biosynthesis of vitamins can be performed by many bacteria, yeast and plants, but humans need to acquire most of these essential nutrients with food. In recent years, new types of action of the(More)
Neutrophils use different mechanisms to cope with pathogens that invade the host organism. The most intriguing of these responses is a release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of decondensed chromatin and granular proteins with antimicrobial activity. An important potential target of NETs is Candida albicans-an opportunistic fungal pathogen(More)
Constant cross talk between Candida albicans yeast cells and their human host determines the outcome of fungal colonization and, eventually, the progress of infectious disease (candidiasis). An effective weapon used by C. albicans to cope with the host defense system is the release of 10 distinct secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs). Here, we validate a(More)
The increased incidence of severe disseminated infections caused by opportunistic yeast-like fungi Candida spp. highlights the urgent need for research into the major virulence factors of these pathogens - extracellular aspartic proteinases of the candidapepsin and yapsin families. Classically, these enzymes were considered to be generally destructive(More)
  • 1