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Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa
Homo naledi is a previously-unknown species of extinct hominin discovered within the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa. This species is characterizedExpand
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The Mismeasure of Science: Stephen Jay Gould versus Samuel George Morton on Skulls and Bias
Stephen Jay Gould, the prominent evolutionary biologist and science historian, argued that “unconscious manipulation of data may be a scientific norm” because “scientists are human beings rooted inExpand
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New fossil remains of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber, South Africa
The Rising Star cave system has produced abundant fossil hominin remains within the Dinaledi Chamber, representing a minimum of 15 individuals attributed to Homo naledi. Further exploration led toExpand
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Correction: The Mismeasure of Science: Stephen Jay Gould versus Samuel George Morton on Skulls and Bias
The Academic Editor associated with this article was inadvertently omitted. The Academic Editor is: David Penny, Massey University, New Zealand.
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The vertebrae and ribs of Homo naledi.
Hominin evolution featured shifts from a trunk shape suitable for climbing and housing a large gut to a trunk adapted to bipedalism and higher quality diets. Our knowledge regarding the tempo, mode,Expand
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Osteogenic tumour in Australopithecus sediba: Earliest hominin evidence for neoplastic disease
We describe the earliest evidence for neoplastic disease in the hominin lineage. This is reported from the type specimen of the extinct hominin Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa,Expand
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The Cervical Vertebrae of KSD-VP-1/1
A series of six partial cervical vertebrae were recovered in association with the KSD-VP-1/1 postcranial remains from the C2 axis to the C7 vertebral level, representing the oldest adult cervicalExpand
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Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.
The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord sizeExpand
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Lucy's back: Reassessment of fossils associated with the A.L. 288-1 vertebral column.
The Australopithecus afarensis partial skeleton A.L. 288-1, popularly known as "Lucy" is associated with nine vertebrae. The vertebrae were given provisional level assignments to locations within theExpand
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The cervical spine of Australopithecus sediba.
Cervical vertebrae are rare in the early hominin fossil record, presenting a challenge for understanding the evolution of the neck and head carriage in hominin evolution. Here, we examine theExpand
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