Marc Oliver Schäfer

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Honeybee workers, Apis mellifera, can reproduce in queenless colonies. The production of queen-like pheromones may be associated with their reproductive activity and induce nestmates to respond by feeding them. Such frequent trophallaxis could supply their protein needs for oogenesis, constituting a social pathway to worker reproduction. However, some(More)
Small hive beetles (SHBs) are generalists native to sub-Saharan Africa and reproduce in association with honeybees, bumblebees, stingless bees, fruits and meat. The SHB has recently become an invasive species, and introductions have been recorded from America, Australia, Europe and Asia since 1996. While SHBs are usually considered a minor pest in Africa,(More)
Multiple infections of managed honeybee, Apis mellifera, colonies are inevitable due to the ubiquitous ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor and might be an underlying cause of winter losses. Here we investigated the role of adult small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, alone and in combination with V. destructor for winter losses and for infections with the(More)
The transmission of honeybee pathogens by free-flying pests, such as small hive beetles (= SHB), would be independent of bees and beekeepers and thereby constitute a new challenge for pathogen control measures. Here we show that larval and adult SHB become contaminated with Paenibacillus larvae spores when exposed to honeybee brood combs with clinical(More)
1 Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt Freiburg (CVUA), Fachgebiet Bienen, Am Moosweiher 2, 79108 Freiburg, Germany 2 USDA-ARS Bee Research Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA 3 Swiss Bee Research Centre, Agroscope Liebefeld-Posieux Research Station ALP, 3003 Bern, Switzerland 4 Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown(More)
In honeybee, Apis mellifera, colonies infested with larval and adult small hive beetles (SHB), hive material, and in particular honey, tends to ferment, probably due to SHB-associated yeasts such as the predominant Kodamaea ohmeri. Here, we test the effects of organic acids on K. ohmeri and on SHB-infested honey/pollen combs. Organic acids were applied at(More)
The Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is the aetiological agent of chronic bee paralysis, a contagious disease associated with nervous disorders in adult honeybees leading to massive mortalities in front of the hives. Some of the clinical signs frequently reported, such as trembling, may be confused with intoxication syndromes. Therefore, laboratory(More)
Infection with Paenibacillus larvae, the etiological agent of American foulbrood, is lethal for honey bee larvae and may lead to loss of the entire colony. Of the four known ERIC-genotypes of P. larvae, ERIC I and II are most frequently observed and differ significantly in virulence. The course of the disease on the larval level is more accelerated after(More)
Multiple infections of managed honeybee, Apis mellifera, colonies are inevitable due to the ubiquitous ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor and might be an underlying cause of winter losses. Here we investigated the role of adult small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, alone and in combination with V. destructor for winter losses and for infections with the(More)
The small hive beetle (SHB, Aethina tumida) is a parasite and scavenger of honeybee colonies. Here, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the potential of SHB as a vector of honeybee viruses. Using RT-PCR methods, Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) was detected in adult SHBs that: (1) were fed with dead workers with deformed wings, (2) were fed with(More)