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A cell-free preparation of the cytoplasm from activated eggs of Rana pipiens induces, in demembranated sperm nuclei of Xenopus laevis, formation of a nuclear envelope, chromatin decondensation, initiation of DNA synthesis, and chromosome condensation. Both soluble and particulate cytoplasmic constituents are required to initiate these processes in vitro.(More)
A cell-free cytoplasmic preparation from activated Rana pipiens eggs could induce in demembranated Xenopus laevis sperm nuclei morphological changes similar to those seen during pronuclear formation in intact eggs. The condensed sperm chromatin underwent an initial rapid, but limited, dispersion. A nuclear envelope formed around the dispersed chromatin and(More)
To understand how cytokinesis is regulated during mitosis, we tested cyclin-p34cdc2 for myosin-II kinase activity, and investigated the mitotic-specific phosphorylation of myosin-II in lysates of Xenopus eggs. Purified cyclin-p34cdc2 phosphorylated the regulatory light chain of cytoplasmic and smooth muscle myosin-II in vitro on serine-1 or serine-2 and(More)
Incubation of demembranated sperm chromatin in cytoplasmic extracts of unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs resulted in nuclear envelope assembly, chromosome decondensation, and sperm pronuclear formation. In contrast, egg extracts made with EGTA-containing buffers induced the sperm chromatin to form chromosomes or irregularly shaped clumps of chromatin that(More)
Extracts from Xenopus eggs capable of nuclear envelope assembly in vitro were fractionated by differential and density gradient centrifugation. Nuclear envelope assembly was found to require soluble components in the cytosol and two distinct particulate fractions, which we have called nuclear envelope precursor fractions A and B (NEP-A and NEP-B). Both(More)
The three N-terminal, tandemly arranged LysM motifs from a Bacillus subtilis cell wall hydrolase, LytE, formed a cell wall-binding module. This module, designated CWBM(LytE), was demonstrated to have tight cell wall-binding capability and could recognize two classes of cell wall binding sites with fivefold difference in affinity. The lower-affinity sites(More)
To understand how cytokinesis is regulated during mitosis, we tested cyclin-p34 ~2 for myosin-II kinase activity, and investigated the mitotic-specific phosphorylation of myosin-II in lysates of Xenopus eggs. Purified cyclin-p34 ,~-~ phosphorylated the regulatory light chain of cytoplasmic and smooth muscle myosin-I/in vitro on serine-1 or serine-2 and(More)
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