Mandy Muller

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Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) cause widespread infections in humans, resulting in latent infections or diseases ranging from benign hyperplasia to cancers. HPV-induced pathologies result from complex interplays between viral proteins and the host proteome. Given the major public health concern due to HPV-associated cancers, most studies have focused on the(More)
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Over 100 genotypes of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been identified as being responsible for unapparent infections or for lesions ranging from benign skin or genital warts to cancer. The pathogenesis of HPV results from complex relationships between viral and host factors, driven in particular by the interplay between the host proteome and the early(More)
Comparative interactomics is a strategy for inferring potential interactions among orthologous proteins or "interologs". Herein we focus, in contrast to standard homology-based inference, on the divergence of protein interaction profiles among closely related organisms, showing that the approach can correlate specific traits to phenotypic differences. As a(More)
The Human Papillomavirus E2 proteins are key regulators of the viral life cycle, whose functions are commonly mediated through protein-protein interactions with the host cell proteome. We identified an interaction between E2 and a cellular protein called CCHCR1, which proved highly specific for the HPV16 genotype, the most prevalent in HPV-associated(More)
During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonuclease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs escape SOX-induced cleavage and remain robustly expressed. Prominent among these is interleukin-6 (IL-6), a growth factor important for survival of KSHV infected B cells.(More)
1. Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California, 5 USA CA 94720-3370 6 2. Present address: Department of Microbiology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 7 Amherst, MA 01003 USA. 8 3. Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California, 9 USA CA 94720-3370 10 4. Howard(More)
1. Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California, 5 USA CA 94720-3370 6 2. Present address: Department of Microbiology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 7 Amherst, MA 01003 USA. 8 3. Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California, 9 USA CA 94720-3370 10 4. Howard(More)
During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonu- clease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs, including the transcript encoding interleukin-6 (IL-6), escape SOX-induced cleavage. IL-6 escape is mediated through a 3' UTR RNA regulatory element that overrides the(More)
Significant efforts were gathered to generate large-scale comprehensive protein-protein interaction network maps. This is instrumental to understand the pathogen-host relationships and was essentially performed by genetic screenings in yeast two-hybrid systems. The recent improvement of protein-protein interaction detection by a Gaussia luciferase-based(More)
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