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Isoprene emission represents a significant loss of carbon to those plant species that synthesize this highly volatile and reactive compound. As a tool for studying the role of isoprene in plant physiology and biochemistry, we developed transgenic tobacco plants capable of emitting isoprene in a similar manner to and at rates comparable to a naturally(More)
Forests have a key role as carbon sinks, which could potentially mitigate the continuing increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and associated climate change. We show that carbon dioxide enrichment, although causing short-term growth stimulation in a range of European tree species, also leads to an increase in soil microbial respiration and a(More)
Approximately 1-2% of net primary production by land plants is re-emitted to the atmosphere as isoprene and monoterpenes. These emissions play major roles in atmospheric chemistry and air pollution-climate interactions. Phenomenological models have been developed to predict their emission rates, but limited understanding of the function and regulation of(More)
Isoprene (C(5)H(8), 2-methyl 1,3-butadiene) is synthesized and emitted by many, but not all, plants. Unlike other related volatile organic compounds (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes), isoprene has not been shown to mediate plant-herbivore interactions. Here, for the first time, we show, in feeding choice tests using isoprene-emitting transgenic tobacco(More)
The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) profile emitted from plants often changes in response to environmental factors, and monitoring the change of such profiles could provide a nondestructive means of plant health measurement An electronic nose (e-nose) was used to discriminate among VOC bouquets emitted by cucumber, pepper, and tomato leaves subjected to(More)
Isoprene is a volatile 5-carbon hydrocarbon derived from the chloroplastic methylerythritol 2-C-methyl-D: -erythritol 4-phosphate isoprenoid pathway. In plants, isoprene emission is controlled by the enzyme isoprene synthase; however, there is still relatively little known about the genetics and regulation of this enzyme. Isoprene synthase gene structure(More)
The photosynthetic responses of the tropical tree species Acacia nigrescens Oliv. grown at different atmospheric CO(2) concentrations-from sub-ambient to super-ambient-have been studied. Light-saturated rates of net photosynthesis (A (sat)) in A. nigrescens, measured after 120 days exposure, increased significantly from sub-ambient (196 microL L(-1)) to(More)
The emission of isoprene from the biosphere to the atmosphere has a profound effect on the Earth's atmospheric system. Until now, it has been assumed that the primary short-term controls on isoprene emission are photosynthetically active radiation and temperature. Here we show that isoprene emissions from a tropical tree (oil palm, Elaeis guineensis) are(More)
In higher plants, many isoprenoids are synthesised via the chloroplastic 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate/2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Attempts to elucidate the function of individual isoprenoids have used the antibiotic/herbicidal compound fosmidomycin (3-[N-formyl-N-hydroxy amino] propyl phosphonic acid) to inhibit this pathway.(More)
This study examined whether two genotypes of hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa), previously classified as ozone tolerant and ozone sensitive, had differing physiological and biochemical responses when fumigated with 120 nL L(-1) ozone for 6 h per day for eight consecutive days. Isoprene emission rate, ozone uptake and a number of(More)