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Vertebrate laterality, which is manifested by asymmetrically placed organs [1], depends on asymmetric activation of the Nodal signaling cascade in the left lateral plate mesoderm [2]. In fish, amphibians, and mammals, a cilia-driven leftward flow of extracellular fluid acts upstream of the Nodal cascade [3-6]. The direct target of flow has remained elusive.(More)
Vertebrates display asymmetric arrangements of inner organs such as heart and stomach. The Nodal signaling cascade in the left lateral plate mesoderm in all cases directs asymmetric morphogenesis and placement during organogenesis. Mechanisms that lead up to left-asymmetric Nodal induction seem to differ between the vertebrates. Cilia produce a leftward(More)
Xenopus is a versatile model organism increasingly used to study organogenesis and genetic diseases. The rapid embryonic development, targeted injections, loss- and gain-of-function experiments and an increasing supply of tools for functional in vivo analysis are unique advantages of the Xenopus system. Here, we review the vast array of methods available(More)
Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of CKD in the first three decades of life. However, for most patients with CAKUT, the causative mutation remains unknown. We identified a kindred with an autosomal dominant form of CAKUT. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified a heterozygous truncating mutation(More)
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