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AIMS The goal of this review is to identify the antimicrobial proteins in the oral fluids, saliva and gingival crevicular fluid and identify functional families and candidates for antibacterial treatment. RESULTS Periodontal biofilms initiate a cascade of inflammatory and immune processes that lead to the destruction of gingival tissues and ultimately(More)
We developed a novel titanium coating that has applications for preventing infection-related implant failures in dentistry and orthopedics. The coating incorporates an antimicrobial peptide, GL13K, derived from parotid secretory protein, which has been previously shown to be bactericidal and bacteriostatic in solution. We characterized the resulting(More)
Parotid secretory protein (PSP) (C20orf70) is a salivary protein of unknown function. The protein belongs to the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) family of mucosal secretory proteins that are predicted to be structurally similar to lipid-binding and host-defense proteins including bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and(More)
PSP (parotid secretory protein)/SPLUNC2 (short palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone 2) is expressed in human salivary glands and saliva. The protein exists as an N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated form and both appear to induce agglutination of bacteria, a major antibacterial function for salivary proteins. Both forms of PSP/SPLUNC2 bind LPS(More)
GL13NH2 is a bacteria-agglutinating peptide derived from the sequence of the salivary protein parotid secretory protein (PSP, BPIFA2, SPLUNC2, C20orf70). The peptide agglutinates both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria, and shows anti-lipopolysaccharide activity in vitro and in vivo. However, GL13NH2 does not exhibit bactericidal activity. To generate(More)
In this study we showed TLR2 CpG promoter methylation in periodontitis affected human gingival tissues and in primary human gingival epithelial cells chronically stimulated with P. gingivalis that may instigate epithelial dysbiosis that may create a unique pathogen niche in the gingival crevice and susceptibility to periodontitis.
The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite(More)
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