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Virulence evolution and the trade‐off hypothesis: history, current state of affairs and the future
TLDR
It is argued that the trade‐off hypothesis and its basic extensions are necessary to assess the qualitative impacts of virulence management strategies and many processes such as pathogen adaptation to within‐host competition, interactions with the immune system and shifting transmission routes, will all be interrelated making sweeping evolutionary predictions harder to obtain. Expand
The Dynamics of Multiple Infection and the Evolution of Virulence
TLDR
It appears that evolution and population dynamics give rise to a feedback mechanism that when double infections are frequent, increased virulence is favored; but when pathogens become more virulent, the force of infection will decrease, favoring lower virulence again. Expand
Coevolution of recovery ability and virulence.
TLDR
Here I analyse a simple model for the evolution of the ability to recover from infection, which indicates that if parasites are not allowed to coevolve, the outcome is a single evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Expand
Alternative Food, Switching Predators, and the Persistence of Predator‐Prey Systems
TLDR
A model based on the simplifying assumption that the alternative food source has a fixed density found that equilibria will not be stable at all, and even if switching to alternative food does not stabilize the equilibrium, it may prevent unbounded oscillations and thus promote persistence. Expand
HOST LIFE HISTORY AND THE EVOLUTION OF PARASITE VIRULENCE
TLDR
It is shown that, contrary to classical predictions, an increase in the natural host death rate may select for lower parasite virulence if some form of superinfection occurs. Expand
From Grazing Resistance to Pathogenesis: The Coincidental Evolution of Virulence Factors
TLDR
Experimental proof of the key role of the irp gene in the grazing resistance was evidenced with a mutant strain lacking this gene, suggesting that determinant of virulence may well be originally selected and further maintained for their role in natural habitat: resistance to digestion by free-living protozoa, rather than for virulence per se. Expand
Coevolution of Patch Selection Strategies of Predator and Prey and the Consequences for Ecological Stability
TLDR
This article shows that the combination of both evolutionary and ecological stability criteria not only allows one to test whether ecological theories are compatible with the theory of natural selection but may also lead to new insights, such as why low-quality patches may constitute a partial refuge for the prey. Expand
Local facilitation, bistability and transitions in arid ecosystems.
TLDR
A general model describing the spatial dynamics of vegetation in arid ecosystems considering local facilitation as an essential process is derived and analyzed, which exhibits bistability and vegetation patchiness. Expand
Emergence of a Convex Trade‐Off between Transmission and Virulence
TLDR
It is found that the existence and the convexity of the trade‐off are robust, which implies a definite level of evolutionarily stable virulence (ESV) for the parasite, but it is also shown that the dependence of the ESV on parameter values may be very strong. Expand
The Evolution of Dispersal under Demographic Stochasticity
TLDR
It is shown that demographic stochasticity in itself may provide enough variability to favor dispersal even from patches that are not fully occupied, and that Selected dispersal depends on all aspects of the life‐history profile, including kin selection. Expand
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