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The Strepsiptera problem: phylogeny of the holometabolous insect orders inferred from 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences and morphology.
TLDR
Phylogenetic relationships among the holometabolous insect orders were inferred from cladistic analysis of nucleotide sequences of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 28S rDNA and morphological characters.
Many species in one: DNA barcoding overestimates the number of species when nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes are coamplified
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the presence of COI numts makes this goal difficult to achieve when numts are prevalent and can introduce serious ambiguity into DNA barcoding, which strives for rapid and inexpensive generation of molecular species tags.
The Phylogeny of the Extant Hexapod Orders
TLDR
A well-resolved and robust cladogram of ordinal relationships is produced with the topology of crustacea with representatives of each hexapod order included.
Mecoptera is paraphyletic: multiple genes and phylogeny of Mecoptera and Siphonaptera
TLDR
Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data support a paraphyletic Mecoptera with two major lineages: Nannochoristidae + (Siphonaptera + Boreidae) and Meropidae + ((Choristollaidea + Apteropanorpidae) (Panorpidae + Bittacidae))).
The complete mitochondrial genome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), and an examination of mitochondrial gene variability within butterflies and moths.
TLDR
Comparisons of gene variability across the order suggest that the mitochondrial genes most frequently used in phylogenetic analysis of the Lepidoptera, cox1 and cox2, are amongst the least variable genes in the genome and phylogenetic resolution could be improved by using alternative, higher variability genes such as nad2, nad3, n ad4 and nad5.
The beetle tree of life reveals that Coleoptera survived end‐Permian mass extinction to diversify during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution
TLDR
A phylogeny of beetles based on DNA sequence data from eight nuclear genes, including six single‐copy nuclear protein‐coding genes, for 367 species representing 172 of 183 extant families provides a uniquely well‐resolved temporal and phylogenetic framework for studying patterns of innovation and diversification in Coleoptera.
Loss and recovery of wings in stick insects
TLDR
Stick insects (order Phasmatodea) diversified as wingless insects and that wings were derived secondarily, perhaps on many occasions are shown, suggesting that wing developmental pathways are conserved in wingless phasmids and that ‘re-evolution' of wings has had an unrecognized role in insect diversification.
Fleas and flea-borne diseases.
TLDR
An overall review of flea biology and the distribution of the flea-borne diseases of public health importance throughout the world, their principal flea vectors, and the extent of their public health burden is reviewed.
300 million years of diversification: elucidating the patterns of orthopteran evolution based on comprehensive taxon and gene sampling
TLDR
A robust phylogeny of Orthoptera is established including 36 of 40 families representing all 15 currently recognized superfamilies and based on complete mitochondrial genomes and four nuclear loci, in order to test previous phylogenetic hypotheses and to provide a framework for a natural classification and a reference for studying the pattern of divergence and diversification.
A mitochondrial genome phylogeny of Diptera: whole genome sequence data accurately resolve relationships over broad timescales with high precision
TLDR
The addition of ribosomal and transfer RNA genes to the protein coding genes traditionally used in mitochondrial genome phylogenies improved the resolution and support, contrary to previous suggestions that these genes would evolve too quickly or prove too difficult to align to provide phylogenetic signal at deep nodes.
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