• Publications
  • Influence
Dissociable stages of human memory consolidation and reconsolidation
TLDR
The unique contributions of wake and sleep in the development of different forms of consolidation are described, and it is shown that waking reactivation can turn a previously consolidated memory back into a labile state requiring subsequent reconsolidation.
The Role of Sleep in Cognition and Emotion
  • M. Walker
  • Psychology, Biology
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1 March 2009
TLDR
Accumulating evidence for the role of sleep in memory processing will be discussed, suggesting that the long‐term goal of sleep may not be the strengthening of individual memory items, but, instead, their abstracted assimilation into a schema of generalized knowledge.
A refined model of sleep and the time course of memory formation.
  • M. Walker
  • Biology, Psychology
    The Behavioral and brain sciences
  • 1 February 2005
TLDR
A new neurocognitive framework of procedural learning is offered, consisting first of acquisition, followed by two specific stages of consolidation, one involving a process of stabilization, the other involving enhancement, whereby delayed learning occurs.
Daytime Naps, Motor Memory Consolidation and Regionally Specific Sleep Spindles
TLDR
It is demonstrated that motor memories are dynamically facilitated across daytime naps, enhancements that are uniquely associated with electrophysiological events expressed at local, anatomically discrete locations of the brain.
Prefrontal atrophy, disrupted NREM slow waves, and impaired hippocampal-dependent memory in aging
TLDR
It is found that age-related medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) gray-matter atrophy was associated with reduced NREM SWA in older adults, the extent to which statistically mediated the impairment of overnight sleep–dependent memory retention, suggesting that sleep disruption in the elderly, mediated by structural brain changes, represents a contributing factor to age- related cognitive decline in later life.
The role of sleep in emotional brain function.
TLDR
A proposed framework in which sleep, and specifically rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, supports a process of affective brain homeostasis, optimally preparing the organism for next-day social and emotional functioning is outlined.
REM Sleep, Prefrontal Theta, and the Consolidation of Human Emotional Memory
TLDR
Data support the role of REM-sleep neurobiology in the consolidation of emotional human memories, findings that have direct translational implications for affective psychiatric and mood disorders.
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