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The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS): psychometric properties.
TLDR
Analysis of sensitivity to change in symptom severity in an open-label trial of fluoxetine showed that the IDs-C and IDS-SR were highly related to the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression.
Evaluation of outcomes with citalopram for depression using measurement-based care in STAR*D: implications for clinical practice.
TLDR
The response and remission rates in this highly generalizable sample with substantial axis I and axis III comorbidity closely resemble those seen in 8-week efficacy trials.
Acute and longer-term outcomes in depressed outpatients requiring one or several treatment steps: a STAR*D report.
TLDR
When more treatment steps are required, lower acute remission rates (especially in the third and fourth treatment steps) and higher relapse rates during the follow-up phase are to be expected.
The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Clinician Rating (IDS-C) and Self-Report (IDS-SR), and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Clinician Rating (QIDS-C) and Self-Report
TLDR
The QIDS-SR16 andQIDS-C16, as well as the longer 30-item versions, have highly acceptable psychometric properties and are treatment sensitive measures of symptom severity in depression.
A comparison of nefazodone, the cognitive behavioral-analysis system of psychotherapy, and their combination for the treatment of chronic depression.
TLDR
Although about half of patients with chronic forms of major depression have a response to short-term treatment with either nefazodone or a cognitive behavioral-analysis system of psychotherapy, the combination of the two is significantly more efficacious than either treatment alone.
Acute and Longer- Term Outcomes in Depressed Outpatients Requiring One or Several Treatment Steps: A STAR*D Report
TLDR
The acute and longer-term treatment outcomes associated with each of four successive steps in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial are described and compared.
Difference in treatment outcome in outpatients with anxious versus nonanxious depression: a STAR*D report.
TLDR
Remission was significantly less likely and took longer to occur in these patients than in those with nonanxious depression, and ratings of side effect frequency, intensity, and burden, as well as the number of serious adverse events, were significantly greater in the anxious depression group.
Bupropion-SR, sertraline, or venlafaxine-XR after failure of SSRIs for depression.
TLDR
After unsuccessful treatment with an SSRI, approximately one in four patients had a remission of symptoms after switching to another antidepressant, suggesting any one of the medications in the study provided a reasonable second-step choice for patients with depression.
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