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Cuticular hydrocarbons and reproductive status in the social wasp Polistes dominulus
TLDR
It is suggested that cuticular hydrocarbons are used as cues of ovarian activity in P. dominulus, and the results are discussed in terms of a switch from behavioral dominance to chemical signaling in this wasp. Expand
Worker rank, reproductive status and cuticular hydrocarbon signature in the ant, Pachycondyla cf. inversa
TLDR
It is shown that the composition of cuticular hydrocarbons of egg-l laying workers is quantitatively and qualitatively different from that of non-laying workers and resembles the hydrocarbon blend of the queen but does not completely match it. Expand
Cuticular hydrocarbon dynamics in young adult Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) and the role of linear hydrocarbons in nestmate recognition systems.
TLDR
Chemical assays showed that exposed young wasps readily absorbed hydrocarbons; older ones did not incorporate hydrocarbon, suggesting that the chemical profiles of mature wasps are less prone to chemical shifts than those of newly emerged wasps. Expand
Variation in cuticular hydrocarbon signatures, hormonal correlates and establishment of reproductive dominance in a polistine wasp.
TLDR
The data indicate that the social environment strongly affects reproductive physiology in this wasp, and the role of cuticular hydrocarbons in reproductive signaling in P. dominulus is discussed. Expand
Social Hackers: Integration in the Host Chemical Recognition System by a Paper Wasp Social Parasite
TLDR
Cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of parasites change after usurpation of host nests to match the cuticular profile of the host species, and chemical evidence shows that the parasite queen changes the odour of the nest by the addition of a parasite-specific hydrocarbon. Expand
Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) larvae possess their own chemical signatures.
TLDR
Larval epicuticular substances are sufficient for recognition of nestmate larvae by adults and demonstrate that wasps are able to discriminate between alien and nestmate larval odours. Expand
Chemical mimicry: Male ants disguised by the queen's bouquet
TLDR
It is shown that the winged males of the tropical ant Cardiocondyla obscurior avoid the aggression of wingless males by mimicking the chemical bouquet of virgin queens, but that their mating success is not reduced as a result. Expand
Queen reproduction, chemical signalling and worker behaviour in polygyne colonies of the ant Formica fusca
TLDR
It was found that queens of different reproductive status (with majority, minority or no production) differed in their cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles, and the fecundity of a queen was associated with worker behaviour; the higher a queen's fecundITY, the more attention she received from workers. Expand
Recognition of social parasites as nest-mates: adoption of colony-specific host cuticular odours by the paper wasp parasite Polistes sulcifer
TLDR
Evidence is presented from field data and laboratory experiments that P. sulcifer females adopt a colony–specific host odour that facilitates their acceptance by host females of the usurped colony, the first confirmation that social parasites adopt colony– specific host odours. Expand
Behavioural assays testing the appeasement allomone of Polyergus rufescens queens during host-colony usurpation
TLDR
The role of decyl butyrate (the main component of the secretion of Dufour's gland in newly-mated queens) during host-colony usurpation was investigated in the European amazon ant Polyergus rufescens and it is suggested that it acts as an appeasement allomone. Expand
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