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  • Influence
Psychosocial work environment, job mobility and gender differences in turnover behaviour: a prospective study among the Swedish general population
TLDR
The results indicate that workers will seek to improve poor work environment by changing jobs, with men tended to engage in job mobility when exposed to adverse psychosocial factors, while women did not. Expand
A longitudinal general population-based study of job strain and risk for coronary heart disease and stroke in Swedish men
TLDR
Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as job strain or low control increased the risk for CHD, especially among smokers and blue-collar workers, and there was no increased risk for stroke in any of the JDC categories. Expand
The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men
TLDR
Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as high strain based on the job demand–control model may be associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation, and the observed increase in risk is small and residual confounding may also be present. Expand
A cross-sectional study of the relationship between job demand-control, effort-reward imbalance and cardiovascular heart disease risk factors
TLDR
Analysis between JDC and CHD risk factors illustrated that, for men, JDC was associated with impaired scores in several biomarkers, especially among those in high strain jobs, and some results indicated gender differences regarding sensitivity to work stressors and how the models might capture different psychosocial dimensions. Expand
Cardiovascular fitness in late adolescent males and later risk of serious non-affective mental disorders: a prospective, population-based study
TLDR
Lower fitness in late adolescent males is associated with increased risk of serious non-affective mental disorders in adulthood, and this study examined how having an affected brother might impact the relationship. Expand
Job strain and resting heart rate: a cross-sectional study in a Swedish random working sample
TLDR
Low job control and job strain, but not job demands, were associated with elevated resting heart rate, however, the observed associations were modest and may be explained by confounding effects. Expand
Psychosocial work environment and risk of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease: a prospective longitudinal study of 75 236 construction workers.
TLDR
This exploratory study showed no significant associations between psychosocial work environment and ischemic stroke, and the associations between job demands and control and CHD were inconsistent and weak. Expand
Longitudinal study of occupational noise exposure and joint effects with job strain and risk for coronary heart disease and stroke in Swedish men
TLDR
Investigating whether occupational noise increased the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke and to elucidate interactions with stressful working conditions in a cohort of Swedish men found exposure to occupational noise was associated with an increased risk for CHD and the risk further increased among those with concomitant exposure to high strain. Expand
Psychosocial job conditions, fear avoidance beliefs and expected return to work following acute coronary syndrome: a cross-sectional study of fear-avoidance as a potential mediator
TLDR
This cross-sectional study showed that acute coronary syndrome survivors, who laboured under adverse psychosocial work conditions, held fear-avoidance beliefs towards their workplace, and these beliefs mediated the relationships between high strained or high effort-reward imbalanced work and expected return to work. Expand
Mental disorders and stress resilience in adolescence and long-term risk of early heart failure among Swedish men.
TLDR
Nonpsychotic mental disorder, as well as low stress resilience in late adolescence may be associated with increased risk of early heart failure, potentially an important time for mental health interventions that may reduce both short and long-term consequences. Expand
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