• Publications
  • Influence
Usability engineering - scenario-based development of human-computer interaction
TLDR
This book focuses on the realities of product development, showing how user interaction scenarios can make usability practices an integral part of interactive system development.
How and why people Twitter: the role that micro-blogging plays in informal communication at work
TLDR
This exploratory research project is aimed at gaining an in-depth understanding of how and why people use Twitter and exploring micro-blog's impacts on informal communication at work.
Getting around the task-artifact cycle: how to make claims and design by scenario
TLDR
The approach leverages development practices of current HCI with methods and concepts to support a shift toward using broad and explicit design rationale to reify where in a design process, why the authors are there, and to guide reasoning about where they might go from there.
The state of the art in end-user software engineering
TLDR
This article summarizes and classifies research on end-user software engineering activities, defining the area of End-User Software Engineering (EUSE) and related terminology, and addresses several crosscutting issues in the design of EUSE tools.
Measuring Mobile Users' Concerns for Information Privacy
TLDR
A 9-item scale was shown to reasonably represent the dimensionality of mobile users' information privacy concerns (MUIPC), categorized as perceived surveillance, perceived intrusion, and secondary use of personal information.
Understanding Student Motivation, Behaviors and Perceptions in MOOCs
TLDR
This study identified learning motivations, learning patterns, and a number of factors that appear to influence student retention, and proposed that the issue of retention should be addressed from two perspectives: retention as a problem but also retention as an opportunity.
Paradox of the active user
TLDR
This chapter discusses two empirical phenomena of computer use: (1) people have considerable trouble learning to use computers, and (2) their skill tends to asymptote at relative mediocrity.
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