• Publications
  • Influence
Osteoderm morphology in recent and fossil euphractine xenarthrans
TLDR
An early split of both subfamilies is suggested and the hypothesis that the Euphractinae are more derived than the Dasypodinae is supported, supporting the notion that these taxa are phylogenetically closely related.
New Early Eocene Mammalian Fauna from Western Patagonia, Argentina
TLDR
It is concluded that the two new fossil mammal localities from central-western Patagonia are part of a possible new biochronological unit, but the formal proposal of a new SALMA awaits completion of taxonomic analysis of the materials reported upon here.
New Mammal Faunal Data from Cerdas, Bolivia, a Middle-Latitude Neotropical Site that Chronicles the End of the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum in South America
TLDR
The mammals of Cerdas indicate that the middle latitudes (southern tropics) contributed significantly to the diversity of Miocene mammal communities in South America; and the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum was a key factor in the differentiation of South American mammal assemblages.
Reassessment of the hairy long-nosed armadillo "Dasypus" pilosus (Xenarthra, Dasypodidae) and revalidation of the genus Cryptophractus Fitzinger, 1856.
TLDR
A cladistic study based on several unique characters in the carapace, skull, mandible, and teeth, as well as on the external phylogenetic position relative to other Dasypus, favors the assignment of the hairy long-nosed armadillo to other genus.
New Palaeogene cingulates (Mammalia, Xenarthra) from Santa Rosa, Perú and their importance in the context of South American faunas
TLDR
According to sequences of southern cingulate faunas (especially those of Dasypodidae), the cingulates from Santa Rosa also suggest an age between the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene, and the very low latitude of the Santa Rosa local fauna should be taken into account because in lower latitudes it is not uncommon to find taxa with a more generalized set of characters than those present in contemporary taxa from higher latitudes.
When xenarthrans had enamel: insights on the evolution of their hypsodonty and paleontological support for independent evolution in armadillos
TLDR
Astegotherium supports a recent hypothesis based on molecular data that enamel loss occurred independently not only within xenarthrans but also within dasypodid armadillos, and is therefore likely representative of ancestral cingulates and xenarthans generally.
The phylogenetic and biostratigraphic significance of new armadillos (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Dasypodidae, Euphractinae) from the Tinguirirican (early oligocene) of Chile
TLDR
The unusally complete material from Tinguiririca provides important phylogenetic insights by clarifying the morphology of the cingulate exoskeleton during a key interval in the clade's diversification.
Evolutionary Implications of Dental Eruption in Dasypus (Xenarthra)
TLDR
The basal phylogenetic position of the taxon within dasypodids suggests that diphyodonty and late dental replacement represent the condition of early xenarthrans, and the inferred reduction in the number of molars to a single locus and the multiplication of premolars represent rare features for any living mammal, but may represent apomorphic characters for Dasypus.
Comparative histology and ontogenetic change in the carapace of armadillos (Mammalia: Dasypodidae)
TLDR
Differences between the two subfamilies were observed in the dorsal integument, related to the production of blood cells and the mobility of the carapace, and the Euphractinae present more numerous and larger cavities filled with adipose tissue in the osteoderms.
...
1
2
3
...