• Publications
  • Influence
Why do females mate multiply? A review of the genetic benefits
  • M. Jennions, M. Petrie
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Biological reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical…
  • 1 February 2000
TLDR
It is concluded that post‐copulatory mechanisms provide a more reliable way of selecting a genetically compatible mate than pre-copulatory mate choice and that some of the best evidence for cryptic female choice by sperm selection is due to selection of more compatible sperm. Expand
VARIATION IN MATE CHOICE AND MATING PREFERENCES: A REVIEW OF CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES
TLDR
It is concluded that sexual‐selection studies have paid far less attention to variation among females than to variations among males, and that there is still much to learn about how females choose males and why different females make different choices. Expand
Extra-pair paternity in birds: explaining variation between species and populations.
TLDR
Factors such as breeding density, genetic variation in the population and the intensity of sexual conflicts determine the costs and benefits to males and females of engaging in extra-pair copulations, and therefore contribute to the variation among populations. Expand
Sexually Selected Traits and Adult Survival: A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
In general, males with larger ornaments or weapons, greater body size, or higher rates of courtship showed greater survivorship or longevity, suggesting that male investment in sexually selected traits is not fixed but varies in relation to the ability to pay the underlying costs of expressing these characters. Expand
Peahens prefer peacocks with elaborate trains
TLDR
Observations of one lek, consisting of 10 males, showed that there was considerable variance in mating success and analysis of female behaviour provided good evidence that this non-random mating is a result of a female preference, supporting Darwin's hypothesis that the peacock's train has evolved, at least in part, as a result. Expand
Improved growth and survival of offspring of peacocks with more elaborate trains
TLDR
Results from a controlled breeding experiment show that the offspring of successful lek peacocks (Pavo cristatus) with the most elaborate trains grow and survive better under nearly natural conditions. Expand
Experimental evidence that corticosterone affects offspring sex ratios in quail
  • T. W. Pike, M. Petrie
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological…
  • 7 May 2006
TLDR
Levels of testosterone, 17β-oestradiol and corticosterone are manipulated in breeding female Japanese quail using Silastic implants and results suggest that cortic testosterone may be part of the sex-biasing process in birds. Expand
Intraspecific variation in structures that display competitive ability: large animals invest relatively more
  • M. Petrie
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • 1 August 1988
TLDR
Shield size proved to be positively allometric as predicted and it remains to be tested whether or not positive allometry is a feature of all structures used to display competitive ability. Expand
MHC-correlated odour preferences in humans and the use of oral contraceptives
TLDR
The results suggest that contraceptive pill use could disrupt disassortative mate preferences, because a significant preference shift towards MHC similarity associated with pill use was found, which was not evident in the control group. Expand
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