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Toward resolving deep neoaves phylogeny: data, signal enhancement, and priors.
TLDR
Improved conditional down-weighting techniques to reduce noise relative to signal for deeper divergences and find increased agreement between data sets are described and form a basis for further testing with both nuclear-coding sequences and rare genomic changes. Expand
Polyploidy, phylogeography and Pleistocene refugia of the rockfern Asplenium ceterach: evidence from chloroplast DNA
TLDR
The authors' cpDNA and ploidy data indicate at least six independent origins of polyploids, which suggests long‐term persistence of populations in the southern Mediterranean. Expand
Phylogeographical pattern correlates with Pliocene mountain building in the alpine scree weta (Orthoptera, Anostostomatidae)
TLDR
A model is proposed to explain this phylogeographical structure, which links the radiation of D. connectens to Pliocene mountain building, and maintenance through the combined effects of mountain‐top isolation during Pleistocene interglacials and ice barriers to dispersal during glacials. Expand
Bird evolution: testing the Metaves clade with six new mitochondrial genomes
TLDR
The phylogenetic hypothesis based on 41 avian mitochondrial genomes rejects monophyly of seven Metaves species and it is concluded that the members of Metaves do not share a common evolutionary history within the Neoaves. Expand
The Invertebrate Life of New Zealand: A Phylogeographic Approach
TLDR
It is found that several geophysical processes make similar phylogeographic predictions for the same landscape, rendering confirmation of the drivers of partitioning difficult and future multi-gene analyses where applied to testable alternative hypotheses may help resolve further the rich evolutionary history of New Zealand's invertebrates. Expand
Artificial weta roosts: a technique for ecological study and population monitoring of tree weta (Hemideina) and other invertebrates.
TLDR
The authors' data suggest that occupation of roosts may take a number of years, each roost monitors a very limited area, and that occupation by invertebrates fluctuates seasonally, and it is recommended that data from weta roosting be used primarily for temporal rather than spatial comparisons. Expand
Phylogenetic and biosystematic relationships in four highly disjunct polyploid complexes in the subgenera Ceterach and Phyllitis in Asplenium (Aspleniaceae)
TLDR
Phylogenetic studies using DNA sequences of two chloroplast regions demonstrate that the proposed genus Ceterach is a small clade within the large genus Asplenium, and sister to the Phyllitis clade, which suggests that leaf blades with dense indumenta have evolved at least twice within asplenioid ferns. Expand
After the deluge: mitochondrial DNA indicates Miocene radiation and Pliocene adaptation of tree and giant weta (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae)
TLDR
It is hypothesize that at least three distinct groups of weta survived the Oligocene marine transgression and radiated subsequently, and patterns of genetic diversity within species reflect, in some instances, geographical subdivision in the Pliocene, and in other cases, Pleistocene range changes resulting from climate change. Expand
Geographic parthenogenesis and the common tea‐tree stick insect of New Zealand
TLDR
This work presents data on the distribution and evolutionary relationships of sexual and asexual populations of the New Zealand stick insect, Clitarchus hookeri, and finds that most C. hookeri from putative‐parthenogenetic populations share a common ancestor. Expand
Diversification of New Zealand weta (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Anostostomatidae) and their relationships in Australasia
TLDR
Molecular dating approaches are used to test the plausibility of alternative biogeographic hypotheses for the origin of the New Zealand anostostomatid fauna and found support for divergence of the main clades at, or shortly after, Gondwanan break-up, and dispersal across the Tasman much more recently. Expand
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