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An ecological and evolutionary perspective on human–microbe mutualism and disease
TLDR
The shared evolutionary fate of humans and their symbiotic bacteria has selected for mutualistic interactions that are essential for human health, and ecological or genetic changes that uncouple this shared fate can result in disease.
Animals in a bacterial world, a new imperative for the life sciences
TLDR
Recent technological and intellectual advances that have changed thinking about five questions about how have bacteria facilitated the origin and evolution of animals; how do animals and bacteria affect each other’s genomes; how does normal animal development depend on bacterial partners; and how is homeostasis maintained between animals and their symbionts are highlighted.
The winnowing: establishing the squid–vibrio symbiosis
TLDR
Similar to winnowing during a harvest, the symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous bacterial symbiont Vibrio fischeri involves a step-wise elimination of potential interlopers that ensures separation of the 'grain' from the 'chaff'.
Vibrio fischeri lux Genes Play an Important Role in Colonization and Development of the Host Light Organ
TLDR
This study is the first to show that the capacity for bioluminescence is critical for normal cell-cell interactions between a bacterium and its animal host and presents the first examples of V. fischeri genes that affect normal host tissue development.
Establishment of an animal-bacterial association: recruiting symbiotic vibrios from the environment.
TLDR
It is discovered that when newly hatched squid were experimentally exposed to natural seawater, the animals responded by secreting a viscous material from the pores of the organ, suggesting that this mode of infection may be an example of a widespread strategy by which aquatic hosts increase the likelihood of successful colonization by rarely encountered symbionts.
NO means ‘yes’ in the squid‐vibrio symbiosis: nitric oxide (NO) during the initial stages of a beneficial association
TLDR
Evidence is provided that NO production, a defense response of animal cells to bacterial pathogens, plays a role in the interactions between a host and its beneficial bacterial partner during the initiation of symbiotic colonization.
Transcriptional patterns in both host and bacterium underlie a daily rhythm of anatomical and metabolic change in a beneficial symbiosis
TLDR
The transcriptional, metabolic, and ultrastructural characteristics of a diel rhythm that occurs in the symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri are described.
Microbial Factor-Mediated Development in a Host-Bacterial Mutualism
TLDR
It is reported that Vibrio fischeri also releases TCT, which acts in synergy with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to trigger tissue development in its mutualistic symbiosis with the squid Euprymna scolopes, demonstrating that host interpretation of these bacterial signal molecules is context dependent.
Symbiont recognition and subsequent morphogenesis as early events in an animal-bacterial mutualism.
Bacterial colonization of the developing light organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes is shown to be highly specific, with the establishment of a successful association resulting only when the juvenile
Competitive Dominance among Strains of Luminous Bacteria Provides an Unusual Form of Evidence for Parallel Evolution in Sepiolid Squid-Vibrio Symbioses
TLDR
Experimental evidence for parallel speciation patterns among several partners of the sepiolid squid-luminous bacterial symbioses is reported, indicating a pronounced dominance of native symbiont strains over nonnative strains and revealing a hierarchy of symbionts competency that reflects the phylogenetic relationships of the partners.
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